Tag Archives: stew

Tomatoey Fish, Chard & Leek Stew

Tomatoey Fish, Chard & Leek StewAs regularly readers know I love spices and tend to use them as my go for seasoning, but I also love fresh herbs and they give dishes quite a different flavour.

I know I seem to be using leeks in everything at the moment but they look so wonderful at the markets that they are hard to resist – you could, of course, use onions if you prefer, or if leeks in your area aren’t as spectacular as the ones here in Hawke’s Bay.

Tomatoey Fish, Chard & Leek Stew

Fish stews are a quick and easy alternative to slow cooked meat ones – they are still hearty and warming, but can be made in about half an hour. They are also a great way to use the more meaty and often economic
species.

Serves 4

1 long leek, sliced
1 bunch chard, stems sliced, leaves roughly chopped
olive oil
2 tbsp chopped parsley
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
½ tsp chopped fresh sage or pinch dried
½ tsp chopped fresh thyme leaves or pinch dried
400g can diced tomatoes
600g firm white fish fillets, cut into chunks – on this occasion I used blue moki
sea salt and black pepper

1              Place leek, chard stems and a splash of oil in large frying pan with a lid, over a medium heat, cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 8-10 minutes or until leeks are tender.

2              Add parsley, garlic, sage and thyme and cook, stirring, for 1-2 minutes or until fragrant. Add tomatoes, rinse out can with water and add to pan, bring to simmering and simmer, uncovered, stirring occasionally, for 10-15 minutes or until liquid reduces to make a thick sauce.

3              Add chard leaves, cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes or until chard wilts. Add fish, cover and cook for 5 minutes longer or until cooked. Season to taste with a good grind of salt and black pepper.

So tell me, do you make fish stews?

Where did the ingredients for this dish come from:
Fish: Tangaroa Seafoods – Napier; Garlic: Krismaw Gardens –
Hastings; Chard, parsley, sage, thyme: The Chef’s Garden @
Epicurean
– Hastings; Olive oil: The Village Press – Hastings; Store Cupboard Ingredients: tomatoes, salt, black pepper.

Note: Many of these producers can be found at the Napier Urban Food Market each Saturday morning and/or at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’
Market each Sunday morning.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Other recipes using chard you might like to try:

Potatoes & Chard in Garlicky Saffron Broth

Potatoes & Chard in Garlicky Saffron Broth

Spicy Sautéed Swiss Chard & Onions

Spicy Sautéed Swiss Chard & Onions

Bacon, Ricotta & Chard Open Sandwich

Bacon, Ricotta & Chard Open Sandwich

 

Beef, Eggplant & Coriander Stew

Beef, Eggplant & Coriander StewA stew, yes, but a light, fragrant one, just ideal for this time of year when the evenings are getting cooler, but we aren’t quite out of summer clothes through the day so don’t feel the need for the hearty stews of mid-winter.

There were still some of the lovely Asian eggplant at the market last weekend, so I snapped them up and here I have teamed them with a spicy coriander paste and beef to make a warm stew that is packed with vegetables and flavour.

Beef, Eggplant & Coriander Stew

I used waxy potatoes which held their shape during cooking and I didn’t thicken as the eggplant broke down during cooking and just slightly
thicken the mixture, but you could thicken with a little cornflour at the end.

Serves 4

500g stewing or casserole steak – such as gravy beef, blade steak or shin beef, cut into 2.5cm pieces
sea salt and freshly ground pepper
vegetable oil
400g Thai eggplant, cut into wedges
1 small red onion, cut into wedges
2 carrots, sliced
2 potatoes, cut into bite-size chunks
2 cups stock
extra coriander for garnish
CHILLI CORIANDER PASTE
4 cloves garlic, chopped
a good handful of fresh coriander
1 small red chili such as Bird’s Eye
½ tsp cumin

1              For the paste, place garlic, coriander, chilli, cumin and ¼ cup of the stock in food processor and process to mince and make a paste.

2              Season beef with a good grind of salt. Heat a large saucepan over a medium-high heat, add a good splash of oil and brown meat in
batches. Remove beef and set aside.

3              Add eggplant and onion, cover and cook, stirring
occasionally, for 8-10 minutes or until onion is soft and translucent. Add carrots and potatoes and mix to combine.

4              Return beef to pan and toss to combine. Add paste and mix to combine. Add remaining stock, cover and bring to simmering.
Simmer, stirring occasionally, for 2 hours or until beef is tender –
exact cooking time will depend on the cut you are using. Season to taste with salt and black pepper.

Where did the ingredients for this dish come from:
Beef: Mad Butcher – Hastings;  Onion, eggplant, garlic, carrots,
potatoes:
Krismaw Gardens – Hastings; Coriander, chilli: The Chef’s Garden @ Epicurean – Hastings; Store Cupboard Ingredients:
vegetable oil, cumin, stock, salt, black pepper

Note: Many of these producers can be found at the Napier Urban Food Market each Saturday morning and/or at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’
Market each Sunday morning.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Other beef stews you might like to try:

Dijon, Mushroom & Beef Stew

Dijon, Mushroom & Beef Stew

Asian Beef & Vegetable Stew

Asian Beef & Vegetable Stew

 

Squid & Potato Stew

Squid & Potato Stew 009aAs mentioned in a previous post we do not see fresh squid that often here in Hawke’s Bay, however, the other day at Tangaroa Seafoods there was lovely fresh squid and while I usually buy it un-cleaned on this occasion I took advantage of fact that the fishmonger had done the work for me.

Buying cleaned squid means that you don’t get the tentacles which are a good addition to a stew, but it does saves time. You could also make this recipe using frozen squid tubes or rings which are readily available in most supermarkets – you need the ones that aren’t crumbed or flavoured.

Squid & Potato Stew

To make this a complete one-dish meal, add 1½ cups of peas in the last 5 minutes of cooking.

The best type of potato to use for this recipe is a waxy variety, suitable for boiling, as these will hold their shape during cooking. New Zealand
varieties include Nadine and Draga. For information about potato
varieties check out this Potato Varieties chart and for more information about potatoes visit potatoes.co.nz.

Serves 4

½ cup olive oil
6 cloves garlic, sliced
½ tsp Orcona Smoked Chipotle Flake or dried red chilli flakes, or to taste
½ cup chopped parsley
600g cleaned squid tubes, cut in 1cm wide rings
1 cup dry white wine
400g can diced tomatoes
1kg boiling potatoes, cut into chunks
salt and freshly ground black pepper

1              Place oil in a large heavy-based saucepan and heat gently – the oil should not get too hot or the garlic will burn. Once oil is
heated, add garlic, chipotle flake and half the parsley and cook,
stirring, for 2-3 minutes or until fragrant.

2              Increase heat, add squid and cook, stirring, for 2-3 minutes or until sizzling. Add white wine, bring to the boil, and boil, stirring, for a few minutes to reduce slightly.

3              Add tomatoes, then half fill can with water, swirl and add to pan. Mix to combine. Cover, bring to simmering and simmer for 1 hour. Add potatoes, bring back to simmering and simmer for 30 minutes longer or until squid is very tender and potatoes are cooked. Season to taste with salt and black pepper. Serve scattered with remaining parsley.

Happy cooking and eating.

 Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Another squid recipe you might like to try:

Squid Stew 007a

Squid, Chorizo and White Bean Stew

Korean-inspired Beef Casserole with Cabbage

Korean Beef Stew 007aFirst up, I am no authority on Korean cuisine and at best this dish is inspired by it. However, whenever I do eat or cook it I always find it tasty and interesting.

So I have decided that I am going to explore Korean food a bit more, so expect to some more dishes inspired by this cuisine in coming months.

A few things I have found out to date are:

  • Major ingredients include: sesame oil, soybean paste, soy sauce, salt, garlic and chilli pepper;
  • Korea is the largest consumer of garlic in the world – yes, ahead of Italy!;
  • As with some other Asian cuisines, all dishes are served at the same time;
  • Traditionally rice has been the staple food of Koreans;
  • Kimchi is a standard accompaniment with every meal; and
  • Food is usually eaten with chopsticks and a spoon.

Korean-inspired Beef Casserole with Cabbage

This dish is sweet, savoury, spicy, a little salty and just plain delicious – so give it a try.

You could simmer this on the stove top, but as I was going to be out for several hours I decided to put in the oven where it could look after
itself.

Serves 4

vegetable oil
4 pieces (150-200g each) bone-in shin beef
salt and freshly ground pepper
2 medium red onions, quartered
6 large garlic cloves, coarsely chopped
2 Bird’s chillies, sliced
¼ cup brown sugar
4 cups beef stock
¼ cup soy sauce
1 tbsp maize cornflour mixed with a little cold water
4 cups roughly chopped green cabbage
1 cup bean sprouts of your choice

1              Preheat oven to 160°C.

2              Season beef with salt. Heat a heavy-based, flame- and ovenproof casserole dish over a medium-high heat. Add just enough oil to cover the base of the pan. Add beef and cook for 3-4 minutes each side, to brown. Remove beef and set aside.

3              Reduce heat to medium, add onions, garlic and chillies to pan, cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 8-10 minutes or until onions just start to soften.

4              Add sugar and mix to combine. Stir in stock and soy sauce and bring to simmering. Return meat to pan, cover, transfer to the oven and cook for 2 hours or until meat is tender.

5              Remove meat from pan and set aside. Whisk cornflour
mixture into pan juices, add cabbage to pan and mix to combine.
Return meat to pan and return pan to the oven and cook for 30 minutes longer or until cabbage wilts. To serve, spoon into bowls and top with sprouts.

Serving suggestion: Serve over steamed brown or white rice, tossed with a drizzle of sesame oil and accompany with kimchi or Korean pickles of your choice.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Find out more about Korean Cuisine at TriFood.com

African Smoked Fish & Kumara Stew

African Fish & Kumara Stew 007aSmoky, spicy and warming, this is my take on a rather vague recipe, called African Smoked Fish Stew, which I came across while
researching something else.

So I did some further research on it and found that apparently it is a favourite Ghanaian and Guinean dish – some recipes include a
variety of vegetables while others are simply a chilli-flavoured
tomato sauce with smoked fish. Some recipes also use fresh fish.

In this part of the world cooking in a tomato sauce is traditional and a way to enrich, thicken and extend dishes such as stews and soups.

I had a lovely piece of hot smoked gemfish so mine is a smoked fish version. Any variety of naturally smoked fish could be used –many of the recipes I saw used smoked salmon. I have also given it a bit of New Zealand twist by including kumara. The one thing all the
recipes I came across had in common was the inclusion of chilli and most noted that spiciness was the main characteristic of this dish. You can, of course, adjust the amount according to the tastes of those you are feeding.

African Smoked Fish & Kumara Stew

One of the traditional ways to serve this stew is over steamed white rice.

Serves 4

1 large onion, chopped
2 tbsp vegetable oil
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 tbsp grated fresh ginger
good pinch dried chilli flakes, or to taste
1L chicken or vegetable stock
440g can diced tomatoes
2 tbsp tomato paste
500g kumara, diced
600g hot smoked fish of your choice
salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

1              Place onion and oil in a heavy-based saucepan over a
medium heat. Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 8-10 minutes or until onions are soft and translucent.
2              Add garlic, ginger and chilli flakes and cook, stirring, for 1-2 minutes or until fragrant.
3              Add stock, tomatoes and tomato paste, bring to simmering and cook, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes.
4              Add kumara, cover, bring back to simmering and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 20 minutes or until kumara is tender.
5              Meanwhile, flake fish, removing skin and any bones.
6              Once kumara is cooked, stir in fish, bring back to simmering and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Pork, Celery & Carrot Ragout

Pork Ragu 010aIn French ragout (spelt ragoût and pronounced ra-goo) refers to a stew, so basically a ragout is just a fancy name for a stew and this is exactly what this dish is.

At this time of year canned tomatoes are one of my pantry staples, however, when I realised that for three nights in a row the meal had included a can of tomatoes I thought it was probably time to move in another direction even if it was just for one night. This ragout is the tasty result of that decision.

Pork, Celery & Carrot Ragout

Adding fresh parsley just before serving gives the dish a fresh lift.

Serves 4

500g diced pork
2 tbsp seasoned flour
olive oil
1 large leek, sliced
2 large (about 200g each) carrots, halved lengthwise and sliced
4 sticks celery, sliced
1 cup dry white wine
2 cups chicken stock
½ cup chopped parsley
salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

1              Toss pork in flour to coat. Place 2 tbsp oil in a heavy-based saucpean over a high heat, brown pork in batches and once browned remove and set aside.
2              Reduce heat to medium, add a little more oil to the pan, if necessary, add leek, carrots and celery, cover and cook, stirring
frequently, for 8-10 minutes or until vegetables start to soften. Stir in wine, bring to simmering and simmer, stirring frequently, for 5-10 minutes or until wine reduces by half.
3              Return pork to pan and stir in stock. Cover, bring to
simmering and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 1½-2 hours or until meat is tender. Just prior to serving, stir in parsley and season to taste with salt and pepper.

Serving suggestion: Serve with creamy garlic mashed potatoes or over fettuccine or pappardelle pasta.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Winter Pumpkin & Fish Stew

Fish & Pumpkin Stew 005aPumpkin is a fabulous winter vegetable with its bright colour adding a colourful and happy note to dishes.

In this recipe it is combined with fish, tomatoes, garlic, Italian herbs and spinach to create a warming and substantial meal perfect for cooler nights, that doesn’t take too much time or effort.

Winter Pumpkin & Fish Stew

I usually cook the pumpkin in the microwave as it tends to hold its shape better, but it also depends on the variety of pumpkin. If you have the
opportunity, when purchasing, enquire as to “How the pumpkin cooks and if it holds its shape?” – while this dish will still taste good no matter what pumpkin you use it has a better appearance and combination of textures if there are chunks of pumpkin in the stew.

Serves 4

1kg pumpkin, peeled, cut into 3 cm cubes
2 tbsp vegetable oil
1 large (about 200g) onion, cut into wedges
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 tsp dried Italian herbs
440g can diced tomatoes
2 cups vegetable, chicken or fish stock
1 bunch spinach, leaves shredded
600g firm white fish fillets, cut into large pieces – I used monkfish here, but hoki, moki or hake also work well, buy what looks best on the day
salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste.

1              Steam or microwave pumpkin until just tender. Drain and set aside.
2              Place oil and onion in large heavy-based saucepan over a
medium heat, cover and cook, stirring frequently, for 10 minutes or until onion is translucent. Add garlic and herbs and cook, stirring, for 2-3 minutes longer or until fragrant.
3              Stir in tomatoes and stock and bring to the boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 25-30 minutes or until mixture reduces and
thickens.
4              Add spinach and cook for 3-4 minutes or until wilted. Add fish and reserved pumpkin, cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes or until fish flakes when tested with a fork. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Dijon, Mushroom & Beef Stew

Dijon Beef Stew 004aIt was with interest the other day I saw stewing and casserole steak advertised on special and there was a $1 price difference – the
stewing steak was $8.99 per kilo and the casserole steak $9.99 per kilo.

This, of course, got me thinking “What is the difference between the two?” When I was in buying the steak I decided that the stewing steak was the one I liked the look of the best – it was marbled and while the steak wasn’t labelled as any particular cut it looked like blade or chuck whereas the casserole steak had little marbling and looked to me like topside. So I thought “Well, that is interesting” and popped the cheaper, more appealing (to me) stewing steak in my basket. When I got to the counter, I asked the person on the
checkout what the difference between the types of steak was and I was basically told exactly what I had already worked out, so for this butcher at least there is a difference between what meat you should use for stewing and casseroling, I personally, think they are pretty much interchangeable and it depends of your preface.

Cuts such as shin, chuck, blade, brisket and flank (these were the cuts I was told that were stewing steak) come from hard-working
areas of the beast so contained a lot of connective tissue which when cooked slowly for a long time breaks down and becomes melt in the mouth.

The casserole cuts included topside and fresh silverside and are leaner and do not contain much connective tissue and are also used as slow-roasting cuts.

For more information about the different beef and lamb cuts visit Beef + Lamb New Zealand.

Dijon, Mushroom & Beef Stew

Adding the carrots towards the end of the cooking time means they
retain some firmness and give the stew a lovely carrot flavour that is lost if they are cooked with the meat from the beginning.

I used Masterfoods Dijonnaise mustard which is smooth and creamy and gives the stew the same qualities without using any cream.

Serves 6

olive oil
1 large (about 200g) onion, finely diced
2 sticks celery, sliced
750g stewing beef, in 2.5cm pieces
2 tbsp seasoned flour
2 cups beef stock
¼ cup Dijon-style mustard
1 tbsp  wholegrain mustard
2 large (about 200g each) carrots, halved lengthwise, sliced
butter
250g button mushrooms, quartered
¼ cup chopped flat-leaf parsley
salt and freshly ground black pepper

1              Place 2 tbsp oil, onion and celery in a heavy-based saucepan over a medium heat, cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 8-10 minutes or until onion is translucent. Remove and set aside.
2              Toss meat in flour to coat. Increase heat and add a little more oil to the pan, then brown meat in batches. Once browned remove and set aside with the onion mixture.
3              Add some of the stock to the pan and cook, stirring, to
deglaze and loosen any bits from the bottom. Stir in remaining stock and mustards and whisk to blend.
4              Return onion mixture and meat to the pan, cover, bring to simmering and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 1½-2 hours or until meat is tender.
5              Add carrots, bring back to simmering and simmer for 45 minutes longer or carrots are tender.
6              Meanwhile, melt a knob of butter in a frying pan over a medium heat, add mushrooms and sauté for 10-15 minutes or until brown and tender.
7              Stir mushrooms into the meat mixture, bring back to
simmering and simmer for 10 minutes longer. Stir in parsley and
season to taste with salt and black pepper

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Other beef stews and casseroles you might like to try:

Asian Beef & Vegetable Stew

Asian Beef & Vegetable Stew

Beef Cheeks Braised in Red Wine

Beef Cheeks Braised in Red Wine

Red Capsicum, Leek & Black Pepper Beef Casserole

Red Capsicum, Leek & Black Pepper Beef Casserole

 

Red Capsicum & Spinach Fish Stew

Red Capsicum & Spinach Fish Stew 008aThe capsicum season is coming to its end, but there are still some available at the markets – last weekend I saw them at Orcona,
Krismaw Gardens and Zoe’s Garden – and while they are not as large as they were in the middle of summer they are still
flavoursome, so make the most of them while they are still available and at good prices.

I do realise that this is the fourth recipe in six days which uses
spinach, this is, of course, because the spinach is so lovely at the
moment and spinach is one of my favourite vegetables – I came home from the market with three bunches of it the other day just because it looked so good!

Red Capsicum & Spinach Fish Stew

Any firm white fish fillet can be used for this dish – I used ruby fish, but hoki, moki, hake or warehou would all work equally well.

Serves 4

2 medium (about 150g each) red capsicums, seeds removed, flesh roughly chopped
1 large (about 200g) tomato, roughly chopped
1 large clove garlic, chopped
1 tsp Orcona Smoked Sweet Paprika –
½ cup chicken stock
olive oil
1 tbsp balsamic vinegar
1 onion, chopped
1 bunch spinach, roughly chopped
600g firm white fish fillets, cut into large pieces
salt freshly ground black pepper

1              Place capsicums, tomato, garlic, paprika, stock, ¼ cup oil and vinegar in a blender or food processor process to make a purée.
2              Place onion and 1 tbsp olive oil in frying pan with a lid over a medium heat, cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 8-10 minutes or until onion starts to soften. Stir in purée, bring to simmering and simmer, stirring frequently, for 10 minutes or until reduced.
3              Add spinach and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes or until spinach is completely wilted. Continue simmering to
evaporate any excess liquid given up by the spinach.
4              Season fish with salt and black pepper. Add to pan, cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes longer or until fish is cooked. Season to taste.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Squid, Chorizo and White Bean Stew

Squid Stew 007aWhen I visited Tangaroa Seafoods the other day the weather had been good and there was a great array of seafood available including whole squid which I do not see very often here, but when I do I
usually buy it as we really enjoy it and used to buy and eat it
frequently when we lived in Sydney.

We regularly shopped at the Sydney Fish Market where squid was usually available.  If you are visiting Sydney and are interested in food, a trip to the Sydney Fish Market is an experience not to be missed.

It is the largest fish market in the Southern Hemisphere and there are not only fish retailers, but also restaurants, cafes, a deli and sushi bar so there is plenty to see, do and eat even if you aren’t actually buying fish. We often took visitors to the fish market and without fail it was a highlight of their Sydney stay.

Many New Zealand’s are familiar with the frozen squid in
supermarkets, often crumbed, but if you do see it fresh don’t be afraid, rather buy it and learn how to prepare it.

Check out this video with Hugh Faernley-Whittingstall on You Tube to find out how to prepare fresh squid.

The secret to cooking squid is hot and fast or long and slow – this recipe uses the second method and ensures a tender, melt-in-the-mouth dish that makes a great winter meal.

Squid, Chorizo and White Bean Stew

This recipe would also work with frozen squid rings – you need the ones that aren’t crumbed or flavoured.

I have used chorizo from Hawke’s Bay artisan small goods maker Rob Beard of Wild Game Salami. Rob is now at the Hastings Farmers’ Market each Sunday as well as having his shop in Lawn Rd open on Sundays.

Serves 4

1 tbsp olive oil
1 large (about 200g) onion, sliced
2 (about 100g each) chorizo sausages, halved lengthwise and sliced
750g squid, cleaned, tubes cut into 2.5cm rings
1 bulb fennel, thinly sliced
1 stick celery, finely chopped.
4 cloves garlic, sliced thinly
1 tbsp tomato paste
1 tsp Orcona Smoked Sweet Paprika
400g can diced tomatoes
2 cups chicken stock
420g cannellini beans, rinsed and drained
chopped flat-leaf parsley, coriander or fennel fronds, to garnish (optional)
crusty bread, to serve

1              Place oil and onion in a large, heavy-based saucepan over a medium heat and cook, stirring frequently, for 10-15 minutes or
until onion are translucent.

2              Add chorizo and cook, stirring, for 5 minutes longer.

3              Add squid, fennel, celery, garlic, tomato paste and paprika and cook, stirring for 5 minutes longer.

4              Stir in tomatoes and stock, cover, bring to simmering and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 1 hour. Remove cover and simmer for 30 minutes, add beans and cook for 15 minutes longer or until sauce reduces and squid is very tender.

5              Spoon into serving bowls, scatter with parsley, coriander or fennel, if using and accompany with crusty bread.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Other chorizo recipes you might like to try:

Fish & Chorizo Kebabs with Lime Coriander Dressing

Fish & Chorizo Kebabs with Lime Coriander Dressing

Warm Roasted Mushroom, Potato & Chorizo Salad

Warm Roasted Mushroom, Potato & Chorizo Salad

Mussels with Chorizo, Tomato and Wine

Mussels with Chorizo, Tomato and Wine