Tag Archives: smoked fish

African Smoked Fish & Spinach Stew

African Smoked Fish & Spinach Stew

Hello everyone, yes, the computer is fixed – I use a laptop and
apparently there was moisture in the keyboard which made the
machine unusable and as we live in the provinces it took five
working days for a new keyboard to arrive! Anyway all is good now and thanks to JR and his computer guy – Graham of 1st Computer Warehouse – for getting me back up and operating as quickly as they did.

This is a variation on a recipe which I posted in July last year –
African Smoked Fish & Kumara Stew – this lighter healthier version with its smokey warmth is perfect for spring.

African Smoked Fish & Spinach Stew

The smoked fish gives this simple stew bold, rich flavours.

Serves 4

1 large onion, sliced
vegetable oil
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 tbsp grated fresh ginger
good pinch dried chilli flakes, or to taste
2 cups vegetable or chicken stock
400g can diced tomatoes
2 tbsp tomato paste
600g smoked fish of your choice, skin and bones removed, flesh broken into large pieces
1 bunch spinach, leaves chopped
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

1              Place onion and a splash of oil in a heavy-based saucepan over a medium heat. Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 8-10 minutes or until onions are soft and translucent.

2              Add garlic, ginger and chilli flakes and cook, stirring, for 1-2 minutes or until fragrant.

3              Add stock, tomatoes and tomato paste, bring to simmering and cook, stirring occasionally, for 20-25 minutes or until mixture reduces and thickens to form a sauce.

4              Add fish and spinach, cover and simmer for 5-10 minutes or until spinach wilts and fish is heated through. Stir to combine and season with salt and pepper.

So tell me, do you have great technology support when you need it?

Where did the ingredients for this dish come from:
Fish: Tangaroa Seafoods – Napier; Onion, garlic, spinach: Krismaw Gardens – Hastings; Smoked Chipotle Flake: Orcona Chillis ‘n
Peppers
– Hastings; Store Cupboard Ingredients: vegetable oil,
ginger, stock, canned tomatoes, tomato paste, salt, black pepper.

Note: Many of these producers can be found at the Napier Urban Food Market each Saturday morning and/or at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’
Market each Sunday morning.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Other recipes using smoked fish you might like to try:

African Smoked Fish & Kumara Stew

African Smoked Fish & Kumara Stew

Smoked Fish Stuffed Potatoes

Smoked Fish Stuffed Potatoes

Smoked Fish, Leek & Potato Chowder

Smoked Fish, Leek & Potato Chowder

 

Easy Smoked Fish Cakes

Easy Smoked Fish CakesRegular readers may have guessed that we eat fish on a fairly
regular basis – most weeks, three times – but there are times when locally caught fresh fish isn’t as readily as available as others and at these times smoked fish is a great alternative and one of the best ways to use it, is as fish cakes.

These are rustic fish cakes – I don’t bother peeling the potatoes so the mash base it fairly rough, then I flake the fish into fairly large pieces. So there is nothing sophisticated about these easy fish cakes, but they are sure to become a favourite with not only the cook, but also the eaters!

Easy Smoked Fish Cakes

Serves 4 – Makes 8 cakes

500g potatoes, scrubbed and cut into chunks
sea salt
butter
milk
400g smoked fish of your choice, skin and bones removed, flesh broken into pieces
2 green onions, chopped
1 tbsp Dijon mustard
1 egg, lightly beaten
1 lemon
vegetable oil

1              Place potatoes in a saucepan and pour cold water to cover, cover and bring to the boil over a medium heat. Remove lid, add salt to taste and simmer for 15-20 minutes or until potatoes are tender.

2              Drain potatoes, add a knob of butter and enough milk to make a fairly stiff mash. Mash potatoes to make a rough mash, add green onions, mustard, egg and a squeeze of lemon juice and mix to combine.

3              Line a tray with plastic food wrap. Shape mixture into eight cakes and place in freezer for 20 minutes to completely cool.
Alternatively, the fish cakes canbe made earlier in the day and placed in the fridge until required.

4              When ready to cook, place a knob of butter and a good splash of oil in a large frying pan over a medium heat and heat until butter melts and foam subsides. Add fish cakes and cook for 5-6 minutes each side or until browned and heated through.

Serving suggestion: Accompany with a salad of mixed leaves and a homemade tomato sauce, mayonnaise or aioli.

So tell me, do you use smoked fish when fresh is unavailable or the
supply is limited?

Where did the ingredients for this dish come from:
Fish: Tangaroa Seafoods – Napier; Potatoes, green onions: Krismaw Gardens – Hastings; Egg: Verry Eggs – Napier; Milk: Origin Earth
Havelock North; From the garden: lemon; Store Cupboard
Ingredients:
vegetable oil, butter, mustard, salt, black pepper.

Note: Many of these producers can be found at the Napier Urban Food Market each Saturday morning and/or at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’
Market each Sunday morning.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Other smoked fish recipes you might like to try:

Smoked Fish, Leek & Potato Chowder

Smoked Fish, Leek & Potato Chowder

Smoked Fish & Potato Salad with Beetroot Dressing

Smoked Fish & Potato Salad with Beetroot Dressing

Fennel, Potato & Smoked Fish Hash

Fennel, Potato & Smoked Fish Hash

 

Smoked Fish Stuffed Potatoes

Smoked Fish Stuffed Potatoes

Stuffed or twice-cooked potatoes are such a warming and
comforting winter dish.

The other great thing is that they stretch a small amount of protein. The other day JR had been charged with the fish shopping and came home with supposedly three meals of fish – the amount of salmon was fine as was the white fish, but the smoked fish was seriously short so that’s when I decided that it was time for one of my
favourite winter meals – stuffed potatoes.

Smoked Fish Stuffed Potatoes

Serves 4

4 large potatoes
sea salt
knob of butter
about ½ cup milk
250g smoked fish, skin and bones removed, flesh flaked
4 tbsp chopped parsley
½ cup grated hard cheese of your choice – I used a local sheep cheese
smoked paprika

1              Preheat oven to 200°C.

2              Wash potatoes, but do not peel, dry with paper towels.  Pierce with a fork in several places and grind over salt. Place
potatoes on a baking tray and cook, turning over halfway through, for 45-60 minutes or until tender and cooked through.

3              Cut the top from each cooked potato, scoop out the flesh to make potato shells. Place potato flesh, butter and milk in a bowl and roughly mash. Add fish and parsley and mix to combine. Place potato shells back on the baking tray.

4              Fill the empty potato shells with the potato mixture, scatter with cheese and sprinkle with a little paprika. Bake 20-30minutes longer until cheese melts and is golden and potato is heated through.

So tell me, what do you add to stuffed to potatoes for flavour?

Where did the ingredients for this dish come from:
Fish: Tangaroa Seafoods – Napier; Parsley: The Chef’s Garden @ Epicurean – Hastings; Potatoes: Krismaw Gardens – Hastings; Milk, cheese: Origin Earth – Havelock North; Smoked Paprika: Orcona Chillis ‘n Peppers – Hastings; Store Cupboard Ingredients: salt, butter

Note: Many of these producers can be found at the Napier Urban Food Market each Saturday morning and/or at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’
Market each Sunday morning.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Another stuffed potato recipe you might like to try:

Chorizo-stuffed Potatoes

Chorizo-stuffed Potatoes

 

Smoked Fish, Leek & Potato Chowder

Smoked Fish, Leek & Potato Chowder

This recipe is loosely based on a Scottish soup with the wonderful name of Cullen Skink. Cullen Skink is a hearty soup traditionally made with smoked haddock, onions and potatoes.

As with many traditional recipes there are many variations, but a common feature of this soup is to use mashed potatoes as the
thickener, as I have done here. The resulting dish is hearty, but
surprising light that is also gluten-free.

For those wondering about the origins of the name Cullen Skink – Cullen is a small town on the north-east coast of Scotland which is home to this dish. And the ‘skink’ seems to originate from a German word meaning a soup made from shin of beef, but in Cullen the main ingredient is, obviously, smoked haddock and so the name.

Smoked Fish, Leek & Potato Chowder

A great way to use leftover mashed potatoes.

Serves 4

a handful parsley including stems
500g smoked fish of your choice undyed, smoked haddock fillet
1 bay leaf
3 cups milk
60g butter
2 medium leeks, thinly sliced
2 cups fresh or frozen peas
2 cups mashed potato
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

1              Separate parsley leaves and stems – finely chop leaves and aside for later use. Place fish, parsley stems and bay leaf in a large saucepan and pour over milk. Place pan over a medium heat, bring to simmering and simmer for 3-4 minutes. Remove pan from heat,
cover and set aside to stand for 5 minutes – this allows the flavours to infuse through the milk.

2              Remove fish from milk mixture and set aside. Strain milk mixture and reserve. Discard herbs,

3              Melt butter in a clean, large saucepan over a medium heat, add leeks, cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 8-10 minutes or until leeks are soft and translucent.

4              Meanwhile, remove skin and any bones from the fish and flake flesh into large pieces.

5              Stir reserved milk mixture into leeks, then stir in mashed
potato and cook, stirring, until potatoes are completely
incorporated and the mixture is thick and creamy. Add peas and fish and cook, stirring occasionally, until peas are cooked and fish is heated through.

6              Just prior to serving, stir in most of the chopped parsley and season to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Serve scattered with remaining parsley.

Serving suggestion: Accompany with crusty bread and topped with a poached egg.

Where did the ingredients for this dish come from:
Fish: Tangaroa Seafoods – Napier; Potatoes: Krismaw Gardens–
Hastings; Leeks, parsley; The Chef’s Garden @ Epicurean
Hastings; Milk: Origin Earth – Havelock North; Store Cupboard
Ingredients:
butter, peas, bay leaf, salt, black pepper.

Note: Many of these producers can be found at the Napier Urban Food Market each Saturday morning and/or at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’
Market each Sunday morning.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Other smoked fish recipes you might like to try:

Smoked Fish Chowder (Dairy- & Gluten-Free)

Smoked Fish Chowder (Dairy- & Gluten-Free)

African Smoked Fish & Kumara Stew

African Smoked Fish & Kumara Stew

Fennel, Potato & Smoked Fish Hash

Fennel, Potato & Smoked Fish Hash

 

Smoked Fish & Potato Salad with Beetroot Dressing

Smoked Fish & Potato Salad with Beetroot DressingWe are loving beetroot at the moment so when I saw a recipe over on TLT (The Little Things) using beetroot as a dressing for a smoked fish salad, I knew it was something we would enjoy.

I have made quite a few changes to Denise’s Smoked Fish Superfood Salad, but the two dressings that I have used are very similar to hers.

Smoked Fish & Potato Salad with Beetroot Dressing

Serves 4

500g smoked fish of your choice, bones and skin removed, flesh flaked
500g potatoes, cooked
2 cups frozen peas, cooked
mixed salad leaves
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
BEETROOT DRESSING
1 small cooked beetroot, chopped
olive oil
GARLIC & LEMON DRESSING
2 tbsp mayonnaise
3 tbsp natural yogurt
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
lemon juice

1              For beetroot dressing, place beetroot, a good splash of olive oil and a good grind of salt in a mini food processor and process,
adding more olive oil, if necessary, to make puree. Add salt and
pepper to taste.

2              For the garlic dressing, place mayonnaise, yogurt, garlic and squeeze of lemon juice in a small bowl and whisk to combine. Season to taste with salt and black pepper.

3              Place fish, potatoes and peas in a large bowl and toss to
combine. Line a serving platter with salad leaves, pile fish mixture on top, the drizzle with Garlic & Lemon Dressing and dot with Beetroot Dressing.

Where did the ingredients for this dish come from:
Fish: Tangaroa Seafoods – Napier; Potatoes, lemon, garlic: Krismaw Gardens – Hastings; Beetroot, salad leaves: The Chef’s Garden @ Epicurean – Hastings; Yoghurt: Origin Earth – Havelock North;
Olive Oil: The Village Press – Hastings; Store Cupboard
Ingredients:
peas, mayonnaise, salt, black pepper.

Note: Many of these producers can be found at the Napier Urban Food Market each Saturday morning and/or at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’
Market each Sunday morning.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe adapted by Rachel Blackmore

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Kedgeree

KedgereeKedgeree also sometimes called kitcherie, kitchari, kidgeree,
kedgaree, or kitchiri is a dish of boiled rice, flaked smoked fish, curry powder, butter and hard-boiled eggs.

Kedgeree is believed to have been taken to Britain by British
colonials who enjoyed it in India. In Victorian times it was a
breakfast dish and certainly is still great served for a special
breakfast or brunch. However, this is no light weight dish and it stacks up as an economical and easy family meal.

Kedgeree

White rice can be used instead of brown, but I prefer the nuttiness of brown rice so use that.

Leftover rice? Turn it into this delicious one-dish meal.

Serves 4

1 cup brown basmati rice
1 large onion, chopped
vegetable oil
1 tbsp curry powder
300g hot smoked fish, skin and bones removed, flesh flaked
1 cup frozen peas
a good knob of butter
a good handful of fresh parsley, chopped
4 hard-boiled eggs, peeled and quartered

1              Cook rice using your preferred method.

2              Place onion and a good drizzle of oil in a large frying pan over a medium heat, cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 8-10 minutes or until onion is soft and translucent. Add curry powder and cook, stirring, for 1-2 minutes or until fragrant.

3              Add rice, fish and peas and mix to combine. Cover and cook over a medium heat, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes or until heated through.

4              Add butter and most of the parsley and mix gently to
combine. Served topped with eggs and scattered with remaining parsley.

Where did the ingredients for this dish come from:
Fish: Tangaroa Seafoods – Napier; Onion: Krismaw Gardens
Hastings; Eggs: Verry Best Eggs – Napier; Parsley: Epicurean
Supplies
– Hastings; Store Cupboard Ingredients: rice, vegetable oil, curry powder, frozen peas, butter, sea salt, black pepper.

Note: Many of these producers can be found at the Napier Urban Food Market each Saturday morning and/or at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’
Market each Sunday morning.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Fennel, Potato & Smoked Fish Hash

Smoked Salmon Hash 005aI love smoked fish. It is packed with so much flavour that a little goes a long way.

In this recipe the quantity of vegetables could easily be increased without increasing the quantity of fish and the dish would still be
flavoursome and satisfying.

There are two methods of smoking fish, hot and cold. Hot smoking is basically cooking food over smoke and is the method used by most home smokers. Cold smoking is a specialised process and we are most familiar with it in the form of thin slices of salmon in vacuum packs in the supermarket.

In Hawke’s Bay look for hot smoked fish at Tangaroa Seafoods
(Tangaroa St, Ahuriri, Napier); Hawke’s Bay Seafoods (Corner
Pandora Rd & Ahuriri Quay, Ahuriri, Napier, Heretaunga St West, Hastings and Hastings Farmers’ Market every Sunday); and at
supermarkets.

Fennel, Potato & Smoked Fish Hash

On this occasion I used smoked salmon, but any naturally hot smoked fish such as gemfish, hake, hoki or blue cod also work well.

Serves 2-4 depending on the meal and what else is served with it – see serving suggestions below.

500g potatoes, scrubbed – no need to peel
¼ cup olive oil
2 medium fennel bulbs
1 medium (about 150g) red onion, chopped
1 tsp fennel seeds
300g hot smoked fish fillet of your choice, skin and bones removed, flesh flaked
freshly ground black pepper
1 lemon

1              Cook potatoes until just tender – I do this in the microwave as it quick and easy, but use another method if you prefer. Set aside to cool slightly, then cut into 1cm chunks.

2              Trim fennel and reserve any feathery tops. Cut fennel in half lengthwise, remove core and chop.

3              Place 2 tbsp oil, fennel, onion and fennel seeds in a frying pan over a medium heat, cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 10-15 minutes or until vegetables are soft and starting to brown. Remove vegetable mixture from pan and set aside.

4              Heat remaining oil in a clean frying pan over medium heat, add reserved potatoes and cook, turn occasionally, for 10-15 minutes or until golden. Reduce heat, return fennel mixture to pan, mix to combine and cook for 3-4 minutes longer to heat through.

5              Add salmon and mix gently to combine. Season to taste with freshly ground black pepper and cook for 2-3 minutes to warm through. Add a good squeeze of lemon juice, to taste. Serve scatter with chopped reserved fennel tops.

Serving suggestion: For a great bunch or supper, top with a poached egg and accompany with a salad of mixed leaves.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Other smoked fish recipes you might like to try:

African Smoked Fish & Kumara Stew

African Smoked Fish & Kumara Stew

Smoked Fish Chowder (Dairy- & Gluten-Free)

Smoked Fish Chowder (Dairy- & Gluten-Free

 

African Smoked Fish & Kumara Stew

African Fish & Kumara Stew 007aSmoky, spicy and warming, this is my take on a rather vague recipe, called African Smoked Fish Stew, which I came across while
researching something else.

So I did some further research on it and found that apparently it is a favourite Ghanaian and Guinean dish – some recipes include a
variety of vegetables while others are simply a chilli-flavoured
tomato sauce with smoked fish. Some recipes also use fresh fish.

In this part of the world cooking in a tomato sauce is traditional and a way to enrich, thicken and extend dishes such as stews and soups.

I had a lovely piece of hot smoked gemfish so mine is a smoked fish version. Any variety of naturally smoked fish could be used –many of the recipes I saw used smoked salmon. I have also given it a bit of New Zealand twist by including kumara. The one thing all the
recipes I came across had in common was the inclusion of chilli and most noted that spiciness was the main characteristic of this dish. You can, of course, adjust the amount according to the tastes of those you are feeding.

African Smoked Fish & Kumara Stew

One of the traditional ways to serve this stew is over steamed white rice.

Serves 4

1 large onion, chopped
2 tbsp vegetable oil
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 tbsp grated fresh ginger
good pinch dried chilli flakes, or to taste
1L chicken or vegetable stock
440g can diced tomatoes
2 tbsp tomato paste
500g kumara, diced
600g hot smoked fish of your choice
salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

1              Place onion and oil in a heavy-based saucepan over a
medium heat. Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 8-10 minutes or until onions are soft and translucent.
2              Add garlic, ginger and chilli flakes and cook, stirring, for 1-2 minutes or until fragrant.
3              Add stock, tomatoes and tomato paste, bring to simmering and cook, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes.
4              Add kumara, cover, bring back to simmering and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 20 minutes or until kumara is tender.
5              Meanwhile, flake fish, removing skin and any bones.
6              Once kumara is cooked, stir in fish, bring back to simmering and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Smoked Fish Chowder (Dairy- & Gluten-Free)

Smoked Fish Chowder 004aSmoked fish chowder is a creamy, flavoursome, hearty dish – it gets creaminess from milk or milk and cream and while I love the
occasional chowder made like this as readers of this blog will know I am not a great fan of using milk and cream to give soup creaminess. This just a personal preference and while I do not avoid dairy –
seasonal fruit and yogurt are my standard breakfast and I adore cheese – I have never really enjoyed milk and cannot ever remember drinking ‘a glass of milk’.

So when I started thinking about making a smoked fish chowder I thought why not explore making a creamy , flavoursome, hearty dish, minus any butter, cream or milk?

Here is the result, a lighter more vibrant soup than traditional
chowder, but just as tasty and a great dairy- and gluten-free option– accompany with a salad of mixed greens and some crusty bread (gluten-free, if you prefer) for the perfect meal in a bowl.

Smoked Fish Chowder (Dairy- & Gluten-Free)

Use any combination or single smoked fish that takes your fancy. Here I used smoked salmon and trevally as that was what was available when I was buying the fish.

Serves 4-6 (makes about 2.5L) as a light meal

1 tbsp olive oil
2 medium leeks, sliced
2 sticks celery, sliced
2L vegetable or chicken stock
500g potatoes, peeled and chopped
2 cloves garlic, roughly chopped
2 bay leaves
½ tsp dried thyme leaves
2 cups frozen peas
750g smoked fish of your choice, skin and bones removed, flaked
salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
zest and juice 1 lemon
¼ cup roughly chopped coriander

1              Place olive oil, leeks and celery in a saucepan over a medium heat and cook, stirring, for 8-10 minutes or until leeks start to
soften. Remove leek mixture from pan and set aside.
2              Place cold stock, potatoes, garlic, bay leaves and thyme in saucepan, cover and bring to the boil. Remove lid and simmer for 20 minutes or until potatoes are tender. Remove bay leaves and
discard.
3              Puree potato mixture in a blender or using a stick blender. Return to a clean saucepan, place over a medium heat and bring to simmering. Add peas, bring back to simmering and cook for 5 minutes or until peas are just cooked.
4              Add fish and cook for 3-4 minutes longer or until fish is
heated through. Stir in lemon zest and juice and season to taste with salt and pepper. Stir in most of the coriander, reserving a little for garnish.  Ladle soup into bowls, scatter with remaining coriander and serve.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Smoked Trout, Pea & Preserved Lemon Risotto

RisottobI picked up some fresh peas at the market last weekend and with the hot smoked trout leftover from Sunday’s lunch thought a risotto would be just the thing for last night’s dinner.

My Australian readers will be able to buy hot smoked trout,
however if you live in New Zealand you need to know a fisherperson who will catch the trout for you, then they or you need to smoke it. Trout cannot be sold in New Zealand and it is not farmed for the
purposes of eating. So we were feeling extremely lucky that there was some left from Sunday’s lunch and that the fisherman asked us if we would like it! If you cannot get your hands on hot smoked trout, use hot smoked salmon instead.

Preserved lemons are available from speciality food stores which sell Moroccan and Middle Eastern foods. They are lemons that have been pickled in salt and their own juices. Only the skin is used,
however both the flesh and skin are preserved. To use, rinse under cold water, remove the flesh and discard, then chop or thinly shred the rind.

Smoked Trout, Pea & Preserved Lemon Risotto

Serves 4

50g butter
2 tbsp olive oil
1 onion, finely chopped
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1½ cups arborio rice
½ cup white wine
5 cups hot chicken or vegetable stock
2 cups shelled fresh or frozen peas, blanched, refreshed
300g hot-smoked trout fillets, flaked
2 tbs finely chopped flat-leaf parsley
1 tbsp chopped preserved lemon

1              Place butter, oil and onion in large heavy-based saucepan over a medium heat and cook, stirring occasionally, for 8-10 minutes or until onion is soft and translucent. Stir in garlic and cook for 1
minute longer.
2              Stir in rice and cook, stirring for 1 minute to coat grains. Add wine and cook for 2-3 minutes or until wine is absorbed.
3              Stir in 1 cup of hot stock and cook, stirring frequently, until stock is absorbed. Continue adding 1 cup of stock at a time, stirring frequently and allowing stock to be completely absorbed before adding more.
4              With the last cup of stock, add peas and continue cooking until rice and peas are cooked. Fold through three-quarters of the trout, half the parsley and half the preserved lemon.
5              To serve, spoon into serving bowls, scatter with remaining trout, parsley and preserved lemon. Accompany with a salad of mixed leaves dressed with a white wine vinegar and olive oil
dressing.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore