Tag Archives: oxtail

Asian-style Braised Oxtail

Asian-style Braised OxtailOne of the things I love about cooking and food and reading about them, is there always seems to be something to learn whether it’s a new flavour combination, a new food, a new technique or just another way of doing something.

So it was the other day when I was looking for a new idea for cooking oxtail that I came across Trissalicious and a recipe that Trissa shared was one her Aunty Jenni makes. What really caught my eye with this recipe was the method for browning the oxtail – rather than searing the oxtail in a pan it is roasted in the oven at a high heat.

I have some vague recollection of seeing this method previously, but have never tried it and I have to say I was thrilled with the result not only did the meat brown beautifully, but a good amount of the fat was rendered meaning that the final dish was not as fatty – win/win!

Asian-style Braised Oxtail

Trissa and Aunty Jenni attribute this recipe to our New Zealand Free Range Cook Annabel Langbein.

You can make this a day or two in advance, when ready to serve, skim off any fat that has set on the top and reheat at 180°C for 45 minutes or until heat through.

Using a cartouche in this recipe keeps any bits of meat and bone, that maybe sitting above the surface of the liquid, moist.

1.5-2kg oxtail
sea salt
6 cloves garlic, peeled and smashed
5cm piece fresh ginger, thinly sliced
4 star anise
1 cinnamon stick
1 long fresh red chilli
4 thick strips orange peel
400g can diced tomatoes
2 cups water
¼ cup soy sauce
2 tbsp rice wine vinegar
chopped fresh parsley or coriander, for scattering

1              Preheat oven to 220°C. Line a large baking dish with aluminium foil and arrange oxtail in a single layer. Season generously with salt. Roast for 30 minutes.

2              Meanwhile, place garlic, ginger, star anise, cinnamon, chilli, orange peel, tomatoes, water, soy sauce and vinegar in a large casserole dish.

3              Reduce oven temperature to 180°C. Transfer oxtail to casserole dish, pushing pieces into liquid. Cover with cartouche, then with lid and bake for 2½-3 hours or until meat is falling off the bone. Serve scattered with parsley or coriander.

Serving suggestion: I serve this with a carrot and parsnip mash (as recommended by Trissa and a steamed spinach.

To make a cartouche: Tear off a piece of greaseproof or baking paper large enough to cover the dish you are using. Fold the piece of paper into quarters. Then take the folded corner and fold across to form a triangle then fold across again. Place the tip of the triangle at the centre of your dish and tear or cut the opposite end at the edge of the dish. Cut off the tip of the triangle – this makes a hole for steam to escape. Now unfold and you have a paper lid the same size as your dish.

So tell me, do you ever use a cartouche?

Where did the ingredients for this dish come from:
Oxtail: Mad Butcher – Hastings; Onion, garlic: Krismaw Gardens – Hastings; Chilli: Orcona Chillis ‘n Peppers – Hastings; Parsley or
coriander: The Chef’s Garden @ Epicurean – Hastings; From the garden: orange; Store Cupboard Ingredients: salt, ginger, star anise, cinnamon, tomatoes, soy sauce, rice wine vinegar.

Note: Many of these producers can be found at the Napier Urban Food Market each Saturday morning and/or at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’
Market each Sunday morning.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe adapted by Rachel Blackmore

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Other recipes using oxtail you might like to try:

Caribbean-style Oxtail 004a

Caribbean-style Oxtail

Chinese Braised Oxtails

Chinese Braised Oxtails

 

 

Caribbean-style Oxtail

Caribbean-style Oxtail 004aIn this recipe, oxtail and vegetables are cooked and served in a chilli-flavoured, un-thickened broth to create a lighter, but satisfying meal for change of season eating.

This dish came about when I discovered some oxtail in the freezer and thought I better to use it while the weather was still a bit cool.

For more information about oxtail refer to a previous post for
Chinese Braised Oxtails. As recommended for that dish, this one also benefits from being made in advance and refrigerated so that the fat can be removed from the surface of the cold dish.

For best results, make this recipe to the end of step 4 and when ready to serve, preheat oven to 160°C. Remove fat from surface, place over a medium heat and bring to simmering. Add vegetables, transfer to the oven and cook for 1 hour. Do not worry about
overcooking oxtail, the longer and slower it is cooked the more
tender and delicious it becomes.

Caribbean-style Oxtail

An oxtail weighs 1-1.5kg and feeds 2-3 people.

Canned or cooked lima beans could be used instead of potatoes.

Serves 4-6

2kg oxtail pieces
salt and freshly ground black pepper
vegetable oil
1 onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
1 tsp dried oregano
½ teaspoon Orcona Smoked Sweet Paprika
2 tbsp tomato paste
½ tsp Orcona Smoked Chipotle Flake
1 bay leaf
6 cups beef stock
4 potatoes, cut into chunks
4 medium carrots, cut into 5mm slices
4 sticks celery, sliced
2 green onions, chopped

1              Preheat oven to 160°C.

2              Season oxtail with salt. Heat a large heavy-based, flame- and ovenproof casserole dish over a medium heat. Add a little oil and swirl to cover base of dish. Brown oxtail in batches, adding more oil as needed – as each batch browns remove and set aside.

3              Pour off any excess fat leaving about 2 tbsp in dish. Add
onion, garlic, oregano and paprika, cover and cook, stirring
frequently, for 8-10 minutes or until onion softens. Add tomato paste, chipotle flake and bay leaf and cook, stirring, for 1 minute longer.

4              Add stock, mix to combine and bring to simmering. Return oxtail to dish pushing into mixture to cover with liquid. Transfer to oven and cook for 2½-3 hours or until meat is very tender and falling off the bone

5              Add potatoes, carrots and celery and cook for 45 minutes longer or until vegetables are cooked. Season to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Serve scattered with green onions.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Another oxtail recipe you might like to try:

Chinese Braised Oxtails

Chinese Braised Oxtails

 

Chinese Braised Oxtails

Oxtail2 002bOxtails make a wonderfully warming winter dish, but they do take a bit of time to cook and this recipe is best made a day or two in
advance then finished on the day of eating.

This is a great dish to make at the weekend, then to have during the week – it will keep happily in the fridge for a couple of days, then when you want to serve it just pop it in the oven while you are
preparing the rest of the meal. Making in advance also has the
advantage of allowing the fat to set on the surface, which can then be removed prior to reheating thus reducing the fat content – which is a good thing as this is a fatty cut.

What is oxtail, you may ask? As the name implies it is the tail of an ox or more likely these days the tail of any cattle beast. By the time you see the tail in the butchers it has been skinned and cut into pieces – one tail will include a variety of pieces from largish to small and if you resemble them you can see the tail.

Classified as offal, each piece of oxtail consists of a piece of tail bone with marrow in the centre and is surrounded by meat which
becomes gelatinous when cooked. Long slow cooking is required for this cut to be tender and delicious.

This dish takes inspiration from a recipe in a book called Cooking on the Bone by Jennifer McLagan.

Chinese Braised Oxtails

An oxtail weighs 1-1.5kg and feeds 2-3 people.

Serves 4

2kg oxtails, cut into pieces
salt and ground black pepper
vegetable oil
1 large (about 200g) onion, cut into wedges
½ cup Shaoxing rice wine (Chinese rice cooking wine – available from Asian food stores)
2 cups beef stock
¼ cup soy sauce
1 tbsp honey
1 star anise, broken into pieces
5cm piece ginger, bruised
2 garlic cloves, smashed
1 long red chilli, thinly sliced – seeded , if desired
1 orange
chopped coriander, to garnish

1              Preheat oven to 150°C.

2              Heat a large heavy-based, ovenproof dish over a medium heat. Add a little oil and swirl to cover base of dish. Brown oxtail in batches, adding more oil as needed – as each batch browns remove and set aside.

3              Pour off any excess fat leaving about 2 tbsp in dish. Add
onion and cook, stirring frequently, for 8-10 minutes or until
translucent. Add wine and bring to the boil, stirring to remove any browned bits from the base of the pan. Stir in stock, soy sauce and honey. Add star anise, ginger, garlic and chilli and bring back to the boil.

4              Remove 4 strips of zest from orange and add to pan. Set
orange aside for juice to use later in recipe. Return oxtail to pan, bring back to simmering, cover and transfer dish to the oven. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 3 hours or until meat is very tender and
falling off the bone.

5              Remove pan from oven and set aside to cool. If you can see them remove ginger, orange zest and star anise. Refrigerate
overnight.

6              When ready to serve, preheat oven to 150°C. Lift any fat from the surface of the casserole and discard. Cover dish, place in oven and cook, for 1 hour to heat through.

7              Just prior to serving, squeeze ¼ cup juice from orange and stir into dish. Scatter with coriander.

Serving suggestion: Serve on steamed brown or white rice with a green vegetable of your choice.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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