Tag Archives: kumara

Melted Leeks with Kumara

Melted Leeks with Kumara

This vegetable dish makes a lovely side dish for a roast or is delicious as a bed for simply cooked fish. Because the vegetables are cooked in a foil packet there is the added benefit of easy clean-up.

I have used Kiwi’s favourite, red kumara (Owairaka), but gold (Toka Toka) or orange (Beauregard) kumara or any sweet potato could be used.

Last weekend at the market there were beautiful bunches of lovely baby leeks and this is what I have used here, but this recipe would also work with larger leeks, just cut them lengthwise into quarters then crosswise into 15cm pieces.

Melted Leeks with Kumara

Melted leeks? The leeks are so soft they literally melt in your mouth –
delicious!

Serves 4

olive oil
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 bunch small leeks
4 medium kumara, cut into 5mm thick slices
1 large onion, thinly sliced
2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
1 lemon, zest grated, fruit cut into wedges
chilli powder, to taste

1              Preheat oven to 200°C. Cut off a piece of aluminium foil twice the length of your baking dish. Place foil in dish, allowing
excess to overhang the ends. Brush foil in pan with oil and season with a grind each of salt and black pepper.

2              To prepare the leeks, remove any tough outer leaves, then halve lengthwise and thoroughly rinse the layers under cold running water, keeping them as intact as possible.

3              Place kumara slices in a single layer on the foil in the pan, top with onion slices, then with leeks. Scatter with garlic, dot with butter and sprinkle with grated lemon zest and chilli powder to taste.

4              Fold the extra foil back over the vegetables and roll ends and edges together to form a parcel. Bake for 30-45 minutes or until
kumara and onion are tender and leeks very soft. To serve, pile
vegetables onto a serving platter, drizzle with any juices and
accompany with lemon wedges.

Where did the ingredients for this dish come from:
Kumara, onion, leeks: Krismaw Gardens – Hastings; Chilli powder – Spitfire: Orcona Chillis ‘n Peppers – Hastings; Olive oil: The Village Press – Hastings; From the garden: lemon; Store Cupboard
Ingredients:
butter, salt, black pepper.

Note: Many of these producers can be found at the Napier Urban Food Market each Saturday morning and/or at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’
Market each Sunday morning.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

Would you like to receive more great recipes and news from Rachel’s Kitchen NZ?

Subscribe to Rachel’s Kitchen NZ for daily updates via email. Just enter your email address and press ‘Subscribe’.

Beef, Kumara & Cavolo Nero Stew

Beef, Kumara & Cavolo Nero StewMince is an economic and favourite family meal which is also a quick and easy meal solution and here is another way to create a family meal, packed with vegetables, that is sure to become a favourite with both the cook and family.

Cavolo nero also known as black or Tuscan cabbage is a very dark green vegetable which is a member of the kale family and as such is high in vitamins K & C and beta-carotene and is a reasonable source of calcium and is also said to be an anti-inflammatory and to have potent levels of anti-cancer properties – so lots of good reasons to include this winter vegetable in your diet. As in this recipe it is a great inclusion in winter stews and braises.

Beef, Kumara & Cavolo Nero Stew

Chard or kale can be used instead of cavolo nero if that’s what you have or prefer.

Serves 4

1 large onion, chopped
1 large carrot, chopped
1 celery stick, sliced
1 bunch curly kale, stems removed and chopped, leaves roughly
chopped
vegetable oil
pinch chilli powder or to taste
500g lean minced beef
400g can chopped tomatoes
1 tbsp tomato paste
500g kumara or sweet potatoes, cut into chunks

1              Place onion, carrot, celery, kale stems and a splash of oil in frying pan with lid over a medium heat and cook, stirring
occasionally, for 8-10 minutes or until vegetables start to soften.

2              Add chilli powder and cook, stirring, for 1 minute or until
fragrant. Add mince and cook, stirring, for 4-5 minutes or until mince starts to brown.

3              Stir in tomatoes, tomato paste, kumara and kale, rinse
tomato can out with water and add to pan. Cover, bring to
simmering and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 45 minutes or until kumara is tender.

So tell me, do you use cavolo nero and if, so, what is your favourite way of using it?

Where did the ingredients for this dish come from:
Mince: Mad Butcher – Hastings; Onion, carrot, celery, cavolo nero, kumara: Krismaw Gardens – Hastings; Chilli powder – Spitfire:
Orcona Chillis ‘n Peppers; Store Cupboard Ingredients: vegetable oil, canned tomatoes, tomato paste, salt, black pepper.

Note: Many of these producers can be found at the Napier Urban Food Market each Saturday morning and/or at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’
Market each Sunday morning.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

Would you like to receive more great recipes and news from Rachel’s Kitchen NZ?

Subscribe to Rachel’s Kitchen NZ for daily updates via email. Just enter your email address and press ‘Subscribe’.

[email-subscribers namefield=”YES” desc=”” group=”Public”]

 

 

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

Learn more about cavolo nero and some recipes using cavolo nero you might like to try:

Cavolo Nero aka Tuscan Black Cabbage

Cavolo Nero aka Tuscan Black Cabbage

Braised Cavolo Nero & Chicken

Braised Cavolo Nero & Chicken

Cavolo Nero, Leek & Mustard Colcannon

Cavolo Nero, Leek & Mustard Colcannon

 

Rustic Oven Baked Kumara Wedges

Rustic Oven Baked Kumara WedgesRed kumara (Owairaka), is the most widely recognised kumara in New Zealand with its distinctive red skin and a creamy white firm textured flesh it cooks to a delightfully mellow taste. New Zealand’s have long included kumara has part of any roast meal.

There are now a several varieties readily available including: gold (Toka Toka) which has a golden skin and flesh and is sweeter than red kumara; and orange (Beauregard) which has a rich orange flesh and is the sweetest kumara.

Deep-fried kumara wedges are now available from many takeaways, but these spiced and oven-baked ones beat those hands down and are super easy to make – just toss in oil and spices and put in a hot oven.

Rustic Oven Baked Kumara Wedges

Last week at the market JJ Organics had lovely little red kumara, which were being sold as seconds, but as we have agreed on this blog previously, we really don’t think any fresh food should be called a second just
because it isn’t as big or pretty as some others and this was certainly the case with these adorable little kumara.

Serves 4

500g small red kumara, scrubbed
1 tsp ground coriander
1 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp smoked sweet paprika
sea salt
olive oil

1              Preheat oven to 220°C. Line a large baking tray with baking paper.

2              Cut kumara in half lengthwise then cut each half lengthwise into two or three pieces.

3              Place coriander, cumin, paprika and a good grind of salt in a plastic bag with a good splash of oil – only 2-3 tbsp. Add kumara to bag, twist top and shake to coat kumara with spice mixture.

4              Place kumara on prepared baking tray and spread out in a single layer. Bake for 30-45 minutes or until kumara is golden and cooked through.

Where did the ingredients for this dish come from:
Kumara: JJ’s Organics – Napier; Paprika: Orcona Chilli n’ Peppers – Hastings; Olive oil: The Village Press – Hastings; Store Cupboard
Ingredients:
ground coriander, ground cumin, salt, black pepper

Note: Many of these producers can be found at the Napier Urban Food Market each Saturday morning and/or at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’
Market each Sunday morning.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

Would you like to receive more great recipes and news from Rachel’s Kitchen NZ?

Subscribe to Rachel’s Kitchen NZ for daily updates via email. Just enter your email address and press ‘Subscribe’.

[email-subscribers namefield=”YES” desc=”” group=”Public”]

 

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

Other recipes using kumara you might like to try:

Pork, Vegetable & Beer Stew

Pork, Vegetable & Beer Stew

African Smoked Fish & Kumara Stew

African Smoked Fish & Kumara Stew

Moroccan Chicken & Kumara Braise

Moroccan Chicken & Kumara Braise

 

 

Pork, Vegetable & Beer Stew

Pork, Vegetable & Beer StewWith the dreadful weather that is battering the country at the
moment, this stew is the perfect antidote and is sure to warm and fill those who are out and about cleaning up and getting everything back in order.

Pork, Vegetable & Beer Stew

The apples, kumara, beer and pork all combine to make quite a sweet dish, which I think really needs that squeeze of lemon at the end to lift the flavours.

I used the New Zealand red kumara which has a distinctive red skin, a creamy white firm textured flesh that cooks to a delightfully mellow taste, but any variety of kumara or sweet potato works well.

Serves 4-6

600g diced pork
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
vegetable oil
1 cup beer
1 medium onion, cut into wedges
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
3 (about 500g) medium kumara or sweet potatoes, scrubbed, sliced or cut into bite-sized pieces
2 medium apples, cored and cut into wedges
2-3 sprigs fresh thyme
2 cups vegetable or chicken stock
1 tbsp Dijon mustard
1 tbsp tomato paste
1 lemon
roughly chopped parsley, to serve (optional)

1              Season pork with salt. Heat a large saucepan over a medium-high heat, add a splash of oil, then brown meat in batches. Remove meat from pan and set aside.

2              Deglaze pan with a little of the beer, add another splash of oil and onion, cover and cook over a medium heat, stirring occasionally, for 8-10 minutes or until onion is soft and translucent.

3              Add garlic and cook, stirring, for 30 seconds or until fragrant. Return meat to pan, add kumara, apples and thyme and toss to
combine. Stir in remaining beer, stock, mustard and tomato paste, cover, bring to simmering and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 1½-2 hours or until meat is tender. Just prior to serving, season with a squeeze of lemon juice and salt and black pepper. Serve scattered with parsley, if desired.

Where did the ingredients for this dish come from:
Pork: Mad Butcher – Hastings; Onion, garlic, kumara, lemon:
Krismaw Gardens – Hastings; Apples: Pernel – Hastings; Thyme: The Chef’s Garden @ Epicurean – Hastings; Store Cupboard
Ingredients:
vegetable oil, stock, mustard, tomato paste, salt, black pepper.

Note: Many of these producers can be found at the Napier Urban Food Market each Saturday morning and/or at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’
Market each Sunday morning.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

Would you like to receive more great recipes and news from Rachel’s Kitchen NZ?

Subscribe to Rachel’s Kitchen NZ for daily updates via email. Just enter your email address and press ‘Subscribe’.

[email-subscribers namefield=”YES” desc=”” group=”Public”]

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

African Smoked Fish & Kumara Stew

African Fish & Kumara Stew 007aSmoky, spicy and warming, this is my take on a rather vague recipe, called African Smoked Fish Stew, which I came across while
researching something else.

So I did some further research on it and found that apparently it is a favourite Ghanaian and Guinean dish – some recipes include a
variety of vegetables while others are simply a chilli-flavoured
tomato sauce with smoked fish. Some recipes also use fresh fish.

In this part of the world cooking in a tomato sauce is traditional and a way to enrich, thicken and extend dishes such as stews and soups.

I had a lovely piece of hot smoked gemfish so mine is a smoked fish version. Any variety of naturally smoked fish could be used –many of the recipes I saw used smoked salmon. I have also given it a bit of New Zealand twist by including kumara. The one thing all the
recipes I came across had in common was the inclusion of chilli and most noted that spiciness was the main characteristic of this dish. You can, of course, adjust the amount according to the tastes of those you are feeding.

African Smoked Fish & Kumara Stew

One of the traditional ways to serve this stew is over steamed white rice.

Serves 4

1 large onion, chopped
2 tbsp vegetable oil
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 tbsp grated fresh ginger
good pinch dried chilli flakes, or to taste
1L chicken or vegetable stock
440g can diced tomatoes
2 tbsp tomato paste
500g kumara, diced
600g hot smoked fish of your choice
salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

1              Place onion and oil in a heavy-based saucepan over a
medium heat. Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 8-10 minutes or until onions are soft and translucent.
2              Add garlic, ginger and chilli flakes and cook, stirring, for 1-2 minutes or until fragrant.
3              Add stock, tomatoes and tomato paste, bring to simmering and cook, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes.
4              Add kumara, cover, bring back to simmering and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 20 minutes or until kumara is tender.
5              Meanwhile, flake fish, removing skin and any bones.
6              Once kumara is cooked, stir in fish, bring back to simmering and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

Would you like to receive more great recipes and news from Rachel’s Kitchen NZ?

Subscribe to Rachel’s Kitchen NZ for daily updates via email. Just enter your email address and press ‘Subscribe’.

[subscribe2]

 

Moroccan Chicken & Kumara Braise

Chicken & Kumara Braise 007aHere kumara and chicken are combined with the warm spices of Morocco to give two Kiwi favourites an international flavour.

I used the traditional Kiwi favourite, the red kumara – red skin with creamy flesh – but for a more colourful dish orange kumara could be used.

As a vegetable kumara has a lot going for it – it is low in fat,
cholesterol free, low in salt, a good source of fibre, low in kilojoules and naturally gluten free – just watch how you cook it to take
advantage of all these great health benefits.

The three main varieties are: the Kiwi favourite red kumara which is a good source of Vitamins E and C; the orange kumara, a good source of Vitamin C; and the gold kumara with good sources of
Vitamins C and A.

So there are lots of good reasons to eat our favourite vegetable – for more information and kumara recipes visit Love! Kumara – here you will also find information about how kumara growers are developing this sometimes oddly shaped vegetable to be more cook friendly!

Moroccan Chicken & Kumara Braise

This dish can easily be extended by adding more kumara and stock.

Serves 4

2 tbsp olive oil
4 whole chicken legs – thigh and drumstick – separated
1 large (about 200g) onion, diced
1 x 5cm piece fresh ginger, peeled
1 cinnamon stick
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 tsp Orcona Sweet Smoked Paprika
1 tsp ground coriander
1 tsp ground cumin
½ tsp ground turmeric
2 cups chicken stock
2 medium (about 250g each) kumara, cubed
1 tbsp lemon juice, or to taste
salt and freshly ground black pepper
coriander or parsley leaves to garnish (optional)

1              Heat oil in a 28 cm skillet which has deep sides and a lid over a medium heat, add chicken and brown all sides. Remove chicken and set aside.

2              Add onion, ginger and cinnamon to pan, cover and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes or until onion starts to soften. Add garlic, coriander, cumin and turmeric, mix well to combine and cook for 1-2 minutes longer or until fragrant.

3              Return chicken to pan and turn to coat with spice mix. Add stock and kumara, cover, bring to simmering and simmer for 20-25 minutes or until chicken is cooked and kumara is tender. Discard ginger and cinnamon, stir in lemon juice and season to taste with salt and pepper. Scatter with coriander or parsley leaves, if desired, and serve.

Serving suggestion: Serve over steamed couscous with a steamed green vegetable of your choice such as cabbage or spinach.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

Would you like to receive more great recipes and news from Rachel’s Kitchen NZ?

Subscribe to Rachel’s Kitchen NZ for daily updates via email. Just enter your email address and press ‘Subscribe’.

[email-subscribers namefield=”YES” desc=”” group=”Public”]

 

Kumara, Walnut & Feta Salad

I had planned to use rocket in this salad but the warm weather must have made it go to seed because when I went to buy some there was none available so instead I am using lovely organic spinach from JJ’s Organics – but try rocket when it is once again available as I think it would make a really punchy salad, that would be great on a barbecue table. No matter which you use – rocket or spinach – this salad makes a great side dish for meat eaters and ensures that there is an interesting dish for non-meat eaters.

Walnut oil made from Hawke’s Bay grown walnuts is available from Maude & Harry’s Walnut Co at the Hastings Farmers’ Market. Walnut oil has a mild nutty flavour and perfectly complements the walnuts used in this salad.

Locally grown walnuts are readily available in Hawke’s Bay – several stalls at both Farmers’ Markets sell them as do some speciality food stores. Store walnuts in the freezer, this ensures that they do not go rancid. Because of the high oil content of nuts they do not freeze solid and can be used or eaten straight from the freezer.

Sherry vinegar is available from some supermarkets otherwise look for it at speciality food stores.

Kumara, Walnut & Feta Salad

This colourful salad can be served warm or at room temperature.

Serves 4-6 as light meal or 8 as side dish

2 large orange kumara, peeled and cut into 3cm cubes
olive oil
½ cup walnut halves
1 bunch spinach, stems removed, leaves torn into large pieces if necessary
1 bunch green onions, sliced into 1 cm pieces
100g feta, crumbled
GARLIC MUSTARD DRESSING
1 garlic clove, crushed
1 teaspoon Dijon or wholegrain mustard
¼ cup walnut oil
2 tablespoons sherry vinegar

1              Preheat the oven to 220°C.
2              Place kumara in a large baking dish, drizzle with olive oil, season with salt and toss to combine.  Roast for 30 minutes turning every 10 minutes or until kumara is cooked – take care not to overcook. Place walnuts on a separate baking dish and put in oven for the last 5 minutes of cooking time to toast nuts.
3              To make dressing, place garlic, mustard, walnut oil and vinegar in a jar and shake well to combine. Set aside until ready to use.
4              Place the spinach leaves and green onions in a large bowl, drizzle with dressing and toss to combine. Scatter with warm sweet potatoes and walnuts. Finally top with crumbled feta. Serve immediately. Alternatively allow sweet potatoes and walnuts to cool to room temperature before assembling the salad.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore