Tag Archives: korean

Korean-style Sesame Pak Choy

Korean-style Bok ChoyThis is my take on a recipe I saw over on Maangchi the other day.

I love this website for information on Korean cooking and food,
because not only does it have great Korean recipes which can be made by home cooks, but it also has great information about Korean ingredients (with pictures, which is really useful when in the Asian food store, as it seems as if we have the same brands as Maangchi in New York).

There is also a really helpful Beginner’s Guide, so if like me you have taken an interest in this cuisine this certainly a great site to check out.

Locally grown organic baby bok choy from Epicurean Supplies.

Locally grown organic baby bok choy from Epicurean Supplies.

Korean-style Sesame Pak Choy

Maangchi says that if she was in Korean she would use cabbage or sweet potato stems and I can imagine that this would be a delicious way to
prepare cabbage.

In Maangchi’s recipe she uses garlic and a green onion, but as I still had some of the lovely green garlic I got at the market last weekend I used that instead.

Maangchi also serves this as a cold dish, but I served mine at room temperature.

Serves 4-6

6-8 baby bok choy
2 stalks green garlic
2 tbsp fermented soybean paste (doenjang)
1-2 tsp hot pepper paste (gochujang), or to taste
2 tsp sesame oil
2 tsp sesame seeds

1              Cut base off bok choy, separate leaves and wash well under cold running water. I had baby choy so left the leaves whole, but if using more mature bok choy cut into pieces as Maangchi suggests.

2              Bring a large saucepan of water to the boil and blanch bok choy until white stems soften. Drain well.

3              Place green garlic, soy bean paste, hot pepper paste and
sesame oil in a bowl and mix well with a wooden spoon.

4              Add bok choy with a very little of the cooking water to the paste and toss to combine. Serve scattered with sesame seeds.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe adapted by Rachel Blackmore

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Korean-inspired Individual Meatloaves

Korean Meatloaves 005bI know I could have called these patties or rissoles, but doesn’t
‘individual meatloaves’ sound more interesting?

The other day, I just happened to pick up, on special, Seoultown
Kitchen
by Debbie Lee, Kyle Books 2011 and so this recipe is
inspired by one in that book which Debbie calls “Mama Lee’s
Meatloaf”.

Anyway, whatever you want to call them, this is tasty twist on a
family favourite, mince.

Korean-inspired Individual Meatloaves

The Onion-Soy Sauce is quite sweet, but teams well with the slightly spicy meatloaves.

An easy way to get eight even-sized portions of mince mixture is to turn the mixture onto a board and shape into a flattish disk. Divide disk into quarters, then divide quarters in half and now you have eight even-sized portions without any measuring, weighing or guessing.

Makes 8 patties; serves 4

1 small onion, roughly chopped
500g beef mince
1 free-range egg
1 tbsp soy sauce
1 tbsp sesame oil
2 tsp gochujang (Korean hot pepper paste)
1 clove garlic, crushed
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 cup panko breadcrumbs
vegetable oil
chopped green onions, to serve
sesame seeds, to serve
ONION-SOY SAUCE
1 large onion, roughly chopped
¼ cup brown sugar
2 cups beef stock
¼ cup soy sauce
2 tbsp Chinese cooking rice wine
2 tsp cornflour mixed with a little cold water to form a thin paste

1              Place small onion in a food processor and process to make a puree. Place mince, pureed onion, egg, soy sauce, sesame oil,
gochugang, garlic and a good grind of salt and black pepper in a large bowl and using your hands mix to combine. Add breadcrumbs and once again using hands mix to combine. Place in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes to chill.

2              To make Onion-soy Sauce, place large onion in a food
processor and process to make a puree.  Transfer to a saucepan, add sugar, stock, soy sauce and rice wine and mix to combine. Place over a medium heat, bring to simmering and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 25-30 minutes or until sauce reduces by about half. Whisk in cornflour mixture and cook, whisking constantly for 2 minutes or until sauce thickens. Set aside and keep warm.

3              Divide mince mixture into eight even-sized portions, shape in patties, place on a plate lined with plastic food wrap and chill for at least 30 minutes longer.

4              Preheat oven to 200°C.

5              Heat a large non-stick frying pan over a medium-high heat, add patties and cook for 3-4 minutes each side or until browned – you may need to do this in batches. Transfer browned patties to a baking tray and cook in oven for 10 minutes. Stand for a few minutes before serving.

Serving Suggestions

  • Serve patties on a bed of creamy mashed potatoes or steamed rice with sauce spooned over and accompany with a seasonal green vegetable of your choice.
  • Serve patties drizzled with a little sauce, between toasted buns of your choice with mixed salad leaves and pickles.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe adapted by Rachel Blackmore

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Other recipes with Korean flavours you might like to try:

Bulgogi

Bulgogi

Korean Gochujang Fish

Korean Gochujang Fish

Spicy Korean Pork

Spicy Korean Pork and find out more about gochujang

 

Korean Gochujang Fish

Korean Fish 001aAs I continue on my exploration of Korean cuisine I am once again amazed at just how simple many of the dishes are and this would have to be one of the simplest, quickest and spiciest.

I loved this dish, but JR said it was a bit spicy for him, so adjust the amount of gochujang according to your palate and the palates of those you are feeding. Little did JR know that it could have been even spicier – my research tells me that if this was a true Korean dish it would have also included gochugaru (Korean red pepper flakes), now that would have been hot!

For more information about gochujang refer to an earlier post Spicy Korean Pork.

Korean Gochujang Fish

I like to use a meaty fish for this dish and on this occasion I used bluenose as that was what looked best in the fish shop, but hake, monkfish or moki also work well – buy what looks best on the day.

Serves 4

1 tbsp vegetable oil
4 (about 150g each) firm white fish fillets
1 lemon
toasted sesame seeds
2 green onions, chopped cooked rice, to serve
GOCHUJANG SAUCE
1 tbsp gochujang (Korean hot pepper paste)
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
¼ cup soy sauce
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 tbsp sesame oil

1              For the sauce, place gochujang, garlic, soy sauce, sugar and sesame oil in a small bowl and mix to combine. Set aside.

2              Heat a frying pan over a medium-high heat, add vegetable oil and heat. Add fish and cook for 3-4 minutes each side. Squeeze
lemon juice over fish, then spoon over sauce, reduce heat to medium and cook for a few minutes longer, basting with sauce until fish is cooked through and absorbs some of the sauce. Serve immediately scattered with sesame seeds and green onions.

Serving suggestion: Serve over steamed brown or white rice with a steamed green vegetable of your choice or a salad of mixed leaves.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Other Korean-inspired dishes you might like to try:

Spicy Korean Pork

Spicy Korean Pork

Korean-inspired Beef Casserole with Cabbage

Korean-inspired Beef Casserole with Cabbage

Bulgogi

Bulgogi

 

Spicy Korean Pork

Spicy Korean Pork 004aAs mentioned a few weeks ago I am exploring Korean cuisine and here is another tasty Korean dish. It is so quick and easy that it is the sort of dish that you can have on the table within half an hour of walking in the door.

This recipe is adapted from one on the blog Beyond Kimchee where author Holly calls it Easy Spicy Korean Pork for Dummies because she says it is so easy that absolutely anyone could cook it. My
adaption isn’t huge, but it does reduce the heat, but by all means
increase the amount of Korean chilli paste if you wish.

Korean Chilli Paste 005a

Korean chilli, red or hot pepper paste (Gochujang), a staple of
Korean cuisine is a savoury, pungent fermented condiment made from red chilli, glutinous rice, fermented soy beans and salt. It gives dishes a spiciness and sweetness, is available from Asian
supermarkets and comes in resealable tubs which once opened can be stored in the fridge. I’m sure as I continue to explore this cuisine that this ingredient will be used again, but in the meantime add to stir-fries, sauces, dressings and marinades – anytime you want some spice!

Spicy Korean Pork

The secret to dishes such as this is to cut the meat very thinly, this is easier if the meat is very cold or partially frozen.

I served this with a bowl of steamed rice and steamed Chinese broccoli.

Serves 4

2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 tsp grated fresh ginger
1 tbsp toasted sesame seeds
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 tbsp Korean chili paste or to taste
1 tbsp soy sauce
1 tbsp sesame oil
500g pork, any cut, very thinly sliced
vegetable oil
1 large onion, cut into thin wedges

1              Place garlic, ginger, sesame seeds, sugar, chilli paste, soy sauce and sesame oil in a bowl and mix to combine. Add pork and mix to coat pork.

2              Heat a heavy-based frying pan over a high heat, add a drizzle of oil and swirl to coat base of pan, add onion and cooking, tossing for 3-4 minutes or until starts to soften.

3              Push onions to side of pan, add pork and toss several times, then toss with onions and cook, tossing for 3-4 minutes or until pork and onions are cooked.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe adapted by Rachel Blackmore

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Another Korean-inspired recipe you might like to try:

Korean-inspired Beef Casserole with Cabbage

Korean-inspired Beef Casserole with Cabbage