Tag Archives: dariy-free

Braised Cavolo Nero & Chicken

Braised Cavolo Nero & Chicken

Regular readers may have noticed that while I remove the tough centre stems from vegetables such as cavolo nero, kale and chard, I do not discard them, but rather chop and cook them for longer than the leaves – in this recipe the stems are cooked with the leeks.

I do this because I can’t bear to throw this part of the vegetable away – it just seems such a waste and why would I throw something that is perfectly edible in the rubbish?

These stems are delicious, add bulk to a dish and if cook until tender will not be noticed in the finished dish. Colourful chard stems also add colour to your dish.

Braised Cavolo Nero & Chicken

Kale can be used instead of cavolo nero, if you wish.

Serves 4

8 chicken drumsticks
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
olive oil
1 lemon, very thinly sliced and seeds removed
1 leek, thinly sliced
1 bunch cavolo nero, stems removed and sliced, leaves sliced
2 cloves garlic, minced
pinch dried red pepper flakes

1              Season drumsticks with salt. Heat a frying pan over a
medium heat, add a good splash of oil. Add drumsticks and cook for 4-5 minutes, turn over and cook, for 4-5 minutes longer or brown. Remove and set aside.

2              Add lemon slices and cook for 4-5 minutes each side or until brown.

3              Add leek and cavolo nero stems to pan, cover and cook, over a medium heat for 8-10 minutes or until leeks are tender. Add garlic and red pepper flakes and cook, tossing, for 1 minute or until
fragrant. Add cavolo nero leaves and 1 cup water, cover and cook, tossing occasionally, for 5-8 minutes or until cavolo nero starts to wilt.

4              Place drumsticks on top of cavolo nero, cover and cook, over medium heat for 25 minutes or until chicken is cooked. Season
cavolo nero mixture with a good grind of salt and black pepper. Serve with caramelised lemon slices.

So tell me, do you try to use all parts of a vegetable?

Where did the ingredients for this dish come from:
Chicken: Mad Butcher – Hastings; Garlic, lemon: Krismaw Gardens – Hastings; Leek, cavolo nero: Epicurean Supplies – Hastings; Olive oil: The Village Press – Hastings; Store Cupboard Ingredients: red pepper flakes, salt, black pepper.

Note: Many of these producers can be found at the Napier Urban Food Market each Saturday morning and/or at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’
Market each Sunday morning.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Poke Bowl

Poke BowlIf you love sushi and sashimi, you will adore poke.

I have been reading about and researching poke (pronounced po-kay or POH-keh) for at least a year and because I hadn’t had it,
hadn’t been able to get my head around exactly what it should be like.

Back in June I posted a recipe for Tuna & Avocado Rice Bowl and this was one of my first attempts at poke – and while it tasted great and I have made it many times since, I didn’t call it poke, because I didn’t think I had captured the essence of dish.

The other night we were having dinner at Milk and Honey in Napier and it was on the menu, so, of course, I was having it and as I knew I would, I loved it.

The poke at Milk and Honey had a Korean influence, it was teamed with house made kimchi – fabulous – and was pretty spicy. I loved it, but best of all it give me an understanding of what poke is all about. The description on their menu was “Fish poke, kimchi, soy sesame marinade, almond, coriander, toasted wakame”.

My research for this dish tells me, that there are as many variations as there are Hawaiians who make it – this is a Hawaiian dish – so you can really make it your own. This article in the Huffingtonpost is what I have based my version on.

Traditionally made with ahi tuna, on this occasion, I used kingfish, as it at is more readily available here, but if you can get your hands on tuna – use it!

This is such a staple take out dish in Hawaii that I found a number of recipes that just required you to cook the rice and use your
favourite store bought poke – not much good for those who can’t buy poke!

Poke Bowl

One thing that I am sure of, is that, my interpretation of poke is nothing like that which is served in Hawaii, but let me assure you it is very easy and a fabulously spicy dish whose most important ingredient is the
freshest fish possible.

For each serve or bowl

2 green onions, 1 chopped and 1 sliced
fresh chopped chilli, to taste
2 tbsp soy sauce
1 tbsp lemon juice
150g kingfish or tuna or other fish of your choice
sea salt
½ – ¾ cup hot cooked brown or white rice seasoned with rice wine
½-1 avocado, sliced or cubed
micro-greens, to garnish (optional)

1              Place chopped green onion, chilli, soy sauce and lemon juice in a mini food processor and process to mince and combine.

2              Season fish lightly with salt, place in bowl and set aside for 5 minutes. Pour over soy sauce mixture and set aside to marinate for 30 minutes. Drain fish, reserving marinade.

3              To assemble, place a large scoop of rice in a bowl, top with most of the avocado – keeping the best slices for the top – then the fish cubes and remaining avocado. Pour over marinade and garnish with sliced green onion and micro-greens.

Where did the ingredients for this dish come from:
Fish: Tangaroa Seafoods – Napier; Green onions, lemons: Krismaw Gardens – Hastings; Avocado: JJ Organics – Napier; Chilli: Orcona Chilis ‘n Peppers; Micro-greens: The Chef’s Garden @ Epicurean – Hastings; Olive oil: The Village Press – Hastings; Store Cupboard Ingredients: soy sauce, salt, rice.

Note: Many of these producers can be found at the Napier Urban Food Market each Saturday morning and/or at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’
Market each Sunday morning.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Tomato, Fennel & Caper Sauce

Tomato, Fennel & Caper Sauce

There is some lovely young summer fennel in the markets at the
moment, so here I have teamed it with it friend’s onion and
tomatoes to make a versatile sauce – I love the slight aniseed flavour of the fennel and pops of salty flavour from the capers.

Tomato, Fennel & Caper Sauce

This is quite a chunky sauce, so I tend to use it as a base sauce, rather than a spoon over the top – but, of course, it’s up to you.

On this occasion, I served it topped with roasted chicken thighs – it is also good with fish and sausages.

Serves 4

2 small fennel bulbs, sliced, reserve any feathery tops for garnishing
1 small red onion, sliced
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
½ tsp dried Italian herbs
olive oil
500g fresh tomatoes, chopped
1 tbsp capers, drained
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

1              Place fennel, onion, garlic, herbs and a good drizzle of olive oil in a heavy-based saucepan over a medium heat. Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 8-10 minutes or until vegetables soften.

2              Add tomatoes and cook, stirring frequently, for 10-15 minutes or until tomatoes break down and form a fragrant sauce and any excess liquid has evaporated. Stir in capers and season to taste with salt and black pepper. Garnish with chopped fennel tops, if desired.

Where did the ingredients for this dish come from:
Fennel, onion, garlic, tomatoes: Krismaw Gardens – Hastings; Olive oil: The Village Press – Hastings; Store Cupboard Ingredients:
Italian herbs, capers, sea salt, black pepper.

Note: Many of these producers can be found at the Napier Urban Food Market each Saturday morning and/or at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’
Market each Sunday morning.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Other recipes using fennel you might like to try:

Fennel, Leek & Lemon Risotto

Fennel, Leek & Lemon Risotto

Caramelised Fennel and Onion Pizza

Caramelised Fennel and Onion Pizza

Fennel, Potato & Smoked Fish Hash

Fennel, Potato & Smoked Fish Hash

 

Toulouse Sausage, Kale & Bean Stew

Sausage, Kale & Bean Stew 008aPacked with vegetables, beans and chunks of sausage, a bowl of this hearty winter stew will keep everyone satisfied on a chilly winter’s night and leftovers are wonderful for lunch the next day.

While kale is being proclaimed by some as the ‘newest superfood’, it has been cultivated in Europe for over 2,000 years, where it was the most widely eaten green vegetable until the Middle Ages.

Belonging to the Brassica family, kale is known botanically as
Brassica oleracea variety acephala which translates to mean ‘cabbage of the vegetable garden without a head.’

Kale has long been important in colder climates as it frost resistance.

For the home gardener it is an easy crop to grow and there are a number of varieties to choose from. For more information about growing kale and buying seeds check out Kings Seeds.

If you are looking to buy kale, health food stores and farmers’
markets are the best places to look.

There are lots of reasons that kale is attracting so much attention, including that it is high in fibre, low in kilojoules and has no fat. It also aids digestion and is full of nutrients including vitamins A, C and K, folate, magnesium, iron, calcium and antioxidants.

Sausage, Kale & Bean Stew 009a

Toulouse Sausage, Kale & Bean Stew

I used Toulouse sausages from Holly Bacon. These breakfast-sized
sausages are gluten-, dairy- and preservative-free and are simply made from coarsely ground pork, salt and spices.

Serves 4

½ cup dried white beans, such as haricot, lima or cannellini beans, soaked overnight
1 tbsp olive oil
8 Holly Toulouse sausages
2 medium (about 150g each) carrots, roughly chopped
2 small fennel bulbs, sliced
1 large leek, sliced
2 celery sticks, sliced
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1 tbsp dried sage
1L vegetable or chicken stock
440g can diced tomatoes
2 tbsp tomato paste
1 bunch (about 250g) curly kale, stems removed and discarded, leaves chopped
salt and freshly ground black pepper
crusty bread or rolls, to serve

1              Drain beans, place in a saucepan and pour over cold water to cover by about 2.5cm. Place over a medium heat, cover and bring to the boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 45 minutes to 1 hour or until beans are tender. Drain and set aside.

2              Heat oil in a large saucepan, add sausages and cook for 4-5 minutes each side or browned and cooked through, remove and set aside.

3              Add carrots, fennel, leek and celery to pan, cover and cook, stirring frequently, for 8-10 minutes or until vegetables start to
soften. Add garlic and sage and cook, stirring, for 1-2 minutes or until fragrant.

4              Cut sausages into pieces. Add beans and sausages to pan, then stir in stock, tomatoes and tomato paste, cover and bring to the boil. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 20 minutes or until carrots are just tender. Add kale and cook, stirring occasionally, for 20 minutes longer or until kale wilts.

5              Ladle into bowls and accompany with bread or rolls.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Another recipe you might like to try using Holly Toulouse sausages:

Sausage, Bacon & Bean Stoup

Sausage, Bacon & Bean Stoup