Tag Archives: celeriac

Parsnip & Celeriac Bake

Parsnip & Celeriac Bake

You know that the colder weather is here when parsnips are in the markets – and there they were last weekend!

Using two truly winter vegetables – parsnips and celeriac – this is a bake can be assembled in advance and just finished prior to serving, add a little extra time, to ensure that the dish is heated through.

Parsnip & Celeriac Bake

As I have done here, the vegetable mixture can be divided between
individual dishes or ramekins rather than baked in one large dish.

Note: On this occasion I forgot to add the sage – I found the chopped sage still sitting on the chopping board after getting the bake out of the oven – it still tasted good, but the sage does add great flavour.

Serves 4

4 medium parsnips, peeled and cubed
2 cloves garlic, smashed
1 medium celeriac, peeled and cubed
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
butter
¼ cup whole milk
1 tbsp chopped sage leaves
TOPPING
1 cup coarse breadcrumbs
¼ cup grated hard cheese of your choice – I used a local artisian sheep cheese but Parmesan or Romano would also work
1 tbsp olive oil

1              Place parsnips and garlic in a saucepan of cold water, place over a medium-high heat and bring to the boil. Add celeriac, bring back to the boil, add salt to taste and simmer for 10-15 minutes or until parsnips and celeriac are tender. Drain well.

2              Preheat oven to 180°C. Mash parsnip mixture with a good knob of butter and milk. Season to taste with salt and black pepper. Add sage and mix to combine. Spoon vegetable mixture into baking dish.

3              For the topping, combine breadcrumbs, cheese and oil with a good grind of salt and black pepper. Scatter over parsnip/celeriac mash and bake for 25-30 minutes or until topping is crisp and
golden.

Where did the ingredients for this dish come from:
Parsnips, garlic: Krismaw Gardens – Hastings; Celeriac, sage: The Chef’s Garden @ Epicurean – Hastings; Milk, cheese: Origin Earth – Havelock North; Store Cupboard Ingredients: butter, breadcrumbs, salt, black pepper

Note: Many of these producers can be found at the Napier Urban Food Market each Saturday morning and/or at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’
Market each Sunday morning.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Find out more about celeriac:

Celeriac – Don’t be Put Off by Its Appearance

Celeriac – Don’t be Put Off by Its Appearance

Other recipes using parsnips you might like to try:

Braised Lamb Shanks with Mushrooms & Parsnips

Braised Lamb Shanks with Mushrooms & Parsnips

Indian-spiced Roasted Brussels Sprouts & Parsnips

Indian-spiced Roasted Brussels Sprouts & Parsnips

 

Braised Lamb with Celery & Celeriac

Braised Lamb with Celery & Celeriac

If you are meeting celeriac for the first time you might feel a little
intimated and not know quite where to start with preparing this vegetable. But, once you get to know this wonderful winter
vegetable it will be one of the pleasures of the season.

Celeriac (pronounced sell-air-e-ak) has a delicate celery taste, but is a rather unattractive root vegetable, however, it is a delicious
addition to winter meals. Also known as celery root it is a variety of celery which is cultivated for its root.

Braised Lamb with Celery & Celeriac

As regularly readers know, I love lamb shoulder chops – they give you the wonder flavour of lamb at a fraction of the cost of some other cuts and even better, they are often on special! Slow cooking ensures that the meat is soft and unctuous and the celeriac and celery adds a wonderful flavour.

Serves 4

4 (about 750g) lamb shoulder chops
sea salt and freshly pepper
olive oil
1 onion, sliced
2 medium or 1 large celeriac, chopped
2 sticks celery, cut into 5mm thick pieces
2 garlic cloves, sliced
2 cups chicken or vegetable stock
1 tbsp Dijon mustard
chopped fresh parsley

1              Preheat oven to 180°C. Season lamb with salt. Heat a large ovenproof casserole dish over a medium heat, add a good splash of oil and brown lamb for 4-5 minutes each side. Remove chops and set aside.

2              Add onion to pan, cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 8-10 minutes or until onion is soft and translucent. Add celeriac,
celery and garlic and toss to combine. Add stock, mix to combine and bring to simmering. Place chops on top of vegetables, cover and bake for 1¼-1½ hours or until lamb is tender.

3              Remove lamb from pan, set aside and keep warm. Place pan over a medium heat, stir in mustard and season to taste with a good grind of salt and black pepper. Return lamb to pan and cook, for 4-5 minutes longer to heat through. Serve scattered with parsley.

Where did the ingredients for this dish come from:
Lamb: Mad Butcher – Hastings; Onion, celery, garlic: Krismaw
Gardens – Hastings; Celeriac, parsley: The Chef’s Garden @
Epicurean
– Hastings; Olive oil: The Village Press – Hastings; Store
Cupboard Ingredients:
stock, mustard, salt, black pepper

Note: Many of these producers can be found at the Napier Urban Food Market each Saturday morning and/or at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’ Market each Sunday morning.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Follow my blog with Bloglovin

Get to know celeriac:

Celeriac – Don’t be Put Off by Its Appearance

Celeriac – Don’t be Put Off by Its Appearance

Another recipe using celeriac you might like to try:

Celeriac, Cavolo Nero & Bacon Mash

Celeriac, Cavolo Nero & Bacon Mash

 

Celeriac, Cavolo Nero & Bacon Mash

Celeriac Mash 003aWhen I saw this recipe on the BBC Good Food website I knew I had to make it – two of my favourite winter vegetables teamed with
bacon – need I say more!

Market Veg MultiaI am always surprised when people tell me that they find winter
vegetables boring – the contents of my market bags last weekend included gnarly celeriac, blue-green lush cavolo nero, multi-coloured carrots, bright orange pumpkin, delicate baby fennel and rich red Treviso radicchio. None of which could be called boring,
uninteresting or even ordinary – we are having a real vegetable feast this week.

Celeriac, Cavolo Nero & Bacon Mash

This my very slightly adapted version of the recipe on BBC Good Food.

Serves 6

1.5kg celeriac, peeled, cut into chunks
200g Holly bacon, rind removed, cut into strips
1 bunch cavolo nero, stems removed, leaves shredded
50g butter
½ cup chopped flat-leaf parsley
salt and freshly ground black pepper

1              Place celeriac in a saucepan and pour over cold water to
cover. Cover pan, place over a medium heat, bring to the boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 20-25 minutes or until celeriac is
tender.
2              Heat a non-stick frying pan over a medium heat, add bacon and cook, tossing from time to time, for 5 minutes. Add cavolo nero, cover and cook, stirring, occasionally, for 5 minutes longer or until cavolo nero wilts.
3              Drain celeriac, mash with butter and mix in bacon mixture and parsley. Season to taste with salt and freshly ground black
pepper.

Happy cooking and eating.

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Learn more about cavolo nero and celeriac:

Cavolo Nero aka Tuscan Black Cabbage

Cavolo Nero aka Tuscan Black Cabbage

Celeriac – Don’t be Put Off by Its Appearance

Celeriac – Don’t be Put Off by Its Appearance

 

Honey Roasted Winter Vegetables

Honey Roasted Vegetables 010aA visit to the markets at this time of year sees stalls piled with root vegetables including carrots, parsnips, celeriac, kumara, kohlrabi and Jerusalem artichokes, hardier greens such kale, spinach,
cabbage and Brussels sprouts and, of course, pumpkins of all
colours, shapes and sizes.

Gone are the heat loving vegetables – tomatoes, capsicums and
eggplant – and if they are available at some outlets (usually
supermarkets and the like) they are expensive, so it’s now that we should be embracing these cool weather vegetables which are just prefect teamed with casseroles, stews and roasts.

Honey Roasted Winter Vegetables

The easiest way to coat the vegetables with the oil is to place the
vegetables and oil in plastic bag and shake – if you are using any
seasonings add these as well
.

Serves 4 – but can easily be adapted to serve as many as required

2 large potatoes (about 200g each) cut into chucks
2 medium (about 150g each) carrots, cut lengthwise into wedges
2 medium parsnips (about 150g each), cut lengthwise into wedges
1 large (about 500g) celeriac, cut into chunks
1 large red onion, cut into wedges
2 tbsp olive oil
sea salt
1 tbsp clear honey
lots of freshly ground black pepper
½ cup chopped flat-leaf parsley

1              Preheat oven 220°C.
2              Toss the vegetables in oil to coat. Season with salt. Place in a roasting dish and cook, turning several times, for 50-60 minutes or until vegetables are golden and tender.
3              Drizzle with honey and grind over lots of black pepper.
Return to oven and cook for 5 minutes longer or until honey melts. Toss to coat vegetables with honey. Add parsley and toss again.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

Would you like to receive more great recipes and news from Rachel’s Kitchen NZ?

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Learn more about celeriac:

Celeriac – Don’t be Put Off by Its Appearance

Celeriac – Don’t be Put Off by Its Appearance

Celeriac – Don’t be Put Off by Its Appearance

Celeriac at JJ's stall at the Napier Urban Food Market

Celeriac at JJ’s stall at the Napier Urban Food Market

With a delicate celery taste, celeriac (pronounced sell-air-e-ak) is a rather unattractive root vegetable which is a delicious addition to winter meals. Also known as celery root it is a variety of celery which is cultivated for its root.

There are a number of growers in the Farmers’ Markets that grow this vegetable and as it is becoming more popular I am starting to see it in vegetable shops as well.

Coming into season now, all going well it should be around for most of the winter months and into early spring. Bulbs vary in size from small to very large.

SELECTING, STORING AND PREPARING CELERIAC

  • Selection: Choose bulbs which are firm and feel heavy for their size. Avoid those that are wrinkled, discoloured or have slug holes.
  • Preparing: Cut a slice from the top and bottom of each bulb. Place on a board, then using a sharp knife remove the tough outer skin by cutting in the curve from top to bottom of bulb. Rinse, and if needing to keep for more than a few minutes, place in
    acidulated water to prevent browning.
  • Storing: Celeriac will keep for 3-4 months if stored correctly. Store in the vegetable drawer of the refrigerator.

EASY IDEAS FOR USING CELERIAC

Celeriac Mash: Peel and dice bulbs. Place in cold, salted water and bring to the boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 15-20minutes or until tender. Drain, add butter and milk or cream and mash. Note: you do not need as much butter and milk as you need for potatoes as when cooked celeriac is quite moist. Serve as a side dish instead of mashed potatoes. For a more substantial mash, cook with potatoes to make a celeriac and potato mash.

Curried Celeriac Wedges: Peel bulbs and cut into wedges. Bring a large saucepan of salted water to the boil, then add wedges and blanch for 2-3 minutes. Drain, return to saucepan, then add 1 tbsp curry powder, salt to taste and 1-2 tbsp olive oil and toss well to coat. Place wedges on baking tray and roast in a preheated 220°C oven for 30-35 minutes or until wedges are cooked through. Note: they do not tend to crispen as potatoes do, but are delicious never the less.

Celeriac Slaw: Prepare celeriac as described above, grate, toss in lemon juice and add to coleslaw.

Celeriac Remoulade: Peel and coarsely grate 1 large celeriac bulb, toss with a little lemon juice. Mix in ½ cup mayonnaise, 1 tbsp grainy mustard and 1 tbsp chopped flat-leaf parsley. Serves 4 as a sidedish. As a light meal for 2, add some mung bean sprouts to the remoulade then top with crisp cooked bacon and accompany with crusty bread.

Happy cooking and eating.

Information complied by Rachel Blackmore

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