Tag Archives: cavolo nero

Beef, Kumara & Cavolo Nero Stew

Beef, Kumara & Cavolo Nero StewMince is an economic and favourite family meal which is also a quick and easy meal solution and here is another way to create a family meal, packed with vegetables, that is sure to become a favourite with both the cook and family.

Cavolo nero also known as black or Tuscan cabbage is a very dark green vegetable which is a member of the kale family and as such is high in vitamins K & C and beta-carotene and is a reasonable source of calcium and is also said to be an anti-inflammatory and to have potent levels of anti-cancer properties – so lots of good reasons to include this winter vegetable in your diet. As in this recipe it is a great inclusion in winter stews and braises.

Beef, Kumara & Cavolo Nero Stew

Chard or kale can be used instead of cavolo nero if that’s what you have or prefer.

Serves 4

1 large onion, chopped
1 large carrot, chopped
1 celery stick, sliced
1 bunch curly kale, stems removed and chopped, leaves roughly
chopped
vegetable oil
pinch chilli powder or to taste
500g lean minced beef
400g can chopped tomatoes
1 tbsp tomato paste
500g kumara or sweet potatoes, cut into chunks

1              Place onion, carrot, celery, kale stems and a splash of oil in frying pan with lid over a medium heat and cook, stirring
occasionally, for 8-10 minutes or until vegetables start to soften.

2              Add chilli powder and cook, stirring, for 1 minute or until
fragrant. Add mince and cook, stirring, for 4-5 minutes or until mince starts to brown.

3              Stir in tomatoes, tomato paste, kumara and kale, rinse
tomato can out with water and add to pan. Cover, bring to
simmering and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 45 minutes or until kumara is tender.

So tell me, do you use cavolo nero and if, so, what is your favourite way of using it?

Where did the ingredients for this dish come from:
Mince: Mad Butcher – Hastings; Onion, carrot, celery, cavolo nero, kumara: Krismaw Gardens – Hastings; Chilli powder – Spitfire:
Orcona Chillis ‘n Peppers; Store Cupboard Ingredients: vegetable oil, canned tomatoes, tomato paste, salt, black pepper.

Note: Many of these producers can be found at the Napier Urban Food Market each Saturday morning and/or at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’
Market each Sunday morning.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Learn more about cavolo nero and some recipes using cavolo nero you might like to try:

Cavolo Nero aka Tuscan Black Cabbage

Cavolo Nero aka Tuscan Black Cabbage

Braised Cavolo Nero & Chicken

Braised Cavolo Nero & Chicken

Cavolo Nero, Leek & Mustard Colcannon

Cavolo Nero, Leek & Mustard Colcannon

 

Cavolo Nero, Leek & Mustard Colcannon

Cavolo Nero Mash 011aI know I gave you a cavolo nero recipe not long ago and also a cavolo nero fact sheet, but it “‘tis the season” as they say for cavolo nero, so I am making the most of it while is so beautiful.

Left: Cavolo nero at the Hawke's Bay Farmers' Market; Right: Clyde Potter of Epicurean Supplies

Left: Cavolo nero at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’ Market; Right: Clyde Potter of Epicurean Supplies

I purchased the cavolo nero for this recipe from Epicurean Supplies at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’ Market.

Clyde Potter, owner and the force behind Epicurean Supplies
describes himself as the ‘father of cavolo nero in New Zealand’ as he believes he was the first to grow it in New Zealand.

Epicurean Supplies organically grows specialty vegetables – cavolo nero, radicchio, celeriac and a huge range of pumpkins, to name just a few – and herbs and supply many restaurants in the North Island with their wonderful produce. In addition food lovers of Hawke’s Bay can find them at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’ Market each Sunday or can purchase from them direct.

In this recipe, cavolo nero replaces cabbage and the dish is given a spicy hit with the addition of wholegrain mustard.

Cavolo Nero, Leek & Mustard Colcannon

This could also be made with curly kale if you prefer.

Serves 4 as a side dish

50g butter
4 medium leeks, finely sliced
1 bunch cavolo nero, stems removed, leaves shredded
1kg mashing potatoes
½-¾ cup milk, warmed
¼ cup wholegrain mustard

1              Place butter and leeks in a frying pan over a medium heat. Cover and cook, for 8-10 minutes or until soft. Add a little water and cook for 5 minutes longer.
2              Add cavolo nero, and a little more water, if necessary, cover and cook for 10-15 minutes longer or until leeks and cavolo nero are very tender – adding more water during cooking, as necessary – it is important that the mixture does not dry out. The cooked vegetables should be buttery and tender.
3              Meanwhile, place potatoes in a large saucepan, cover with cold water, cover and bring to the boil. Remove cover, add salt to taste and simmer for 10-15 minutes or until potatoes are tender.
4              Drain potatoes, add milk and mash until smooth. Add
mustard and vegetable mixture and mix well to combine.

The Chef’s Garden @ Epicurean Supplies
Kauru Rd, Hastings 4172
Ph: 06-878 3528

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Learn more about cavolo nero and another recipe to try:

Cavolo Nero aka Tuscan Black Cabbage

Cavolo Nero aka Tuscan Black Cabbage

Celeriac, Cavolo Nero & Bacon Mash

Celeriac, Cavolo Nero & Bacon Mash

 

Celeriac, Cavolo Nero & Bacon Mash

Celeriac Mash 003aWhen I saw this recipe on the BBC Good Food website I knew I had to make it – two of my favourite winter vegetables teamed with
bacon – need I say more!

Market Veg MultiaI am always surprised when people tell me that they find winter
vegetables boring – the contents of my market bags last weekend included gnarly celeriac, blue-green lush cavolo nero, multi-coloured carrots, bright orange pumpkin, delicate baby fennel and rich red Treviso radicchio. None of which could be called boring,
uninteresting or even ordinary – we are having a real vegetable feast this week.

Celeriac, Cavolo Nero & Bacon Mash

This my very slightly adapted version of the recipe on BBC Good Food.

Serves 6

1.5kg celeriac, peeled, cut into chunks
200g Holly bacon, rind removed, cut into strips
1 bunch cavolo nero, stems removed, leaves shredded
50g butter
½ cup chopped flat-leaf parsley
salt and freshly ground black pepper

1              Place celeriac in a saucepan and pour over cold water to
cover. Cover pan, place over a medium heat, bring to the boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 20-25 minutes or until celeriac is
tender.
2              Heat a non-stick frying pan over a medium heat, add bacon and cook, tossing from time to time, for 5 minutes. Add cavolo nero, cover and cook, stirring, occasionally, for 5 minutes longer or until cavolo nero wilts.
3              Drain celeriac, mash with butter and mix in bacon mixture and parsley. Season to taste with salt and freshly ground black
pepper.

Happy cooking and eating.

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Learn more about cavolo nero and celeriac:

Cavolo Nero aka Tuscan Black Cabbage

Cavolo Nero aka Tuscan Black Cabbage

Celeriac – Don’t be Put Off by Its Appearance

Celeriac – Don’t be Put Off by Its Appearance

 

Cavolo Nero aka Tuscan Black Cabbage

Cavolo Nero on The Chef's Garden @ Epicurean Supplies stall at the Hastings Farmers' Market

Cavolo nero on The Chef’s Garden @ Epicurean Supplies stall at the Hastings Farmers’ Market

Translated the Italian name cavolo nero literally means black
cabbage. A favourite of Tuscan cooks, this very dark green vegetable has long plume-like leaves with a coarse central rib. On cooking the leaves become even darker, almost black in colour – which explains its name.

Cavolo nero (pronounced ca-voll-oh nee-ro) is a member of the kale family and as such – I am told by Clyde Potter of The Chef’s Garden @ Epicurean Supplies, who grows it – it is high in vitamin K, it is also high in beta-carotene, vitamin C and is a reasonable source of
calcium, as well as been considered to be an anti-inflammatory and to have potent levels of anti-cancer properties.

Cavolo nero is the perfect in season winter vegetable, so now is the time to be making the most of it. It is the ingredient that
distinguishes a traditional Italian Ribollita from an ordinary
minestrone soup and goes well with any number of hearty winter stews and braises.

SELECTION, STORAGE & PREPARATION

Selection: Leaves should be crisp and unblemished with no holes.

Storage: Cavolo nero will keep in the vegetable compartment of the refrigerator for 4-5 days.

Preparation: Remove the tough centre stems, the easiest way to do this is to place the leaf, rough side up on a board, then run a sharp knife along each side of the centre stem.

To cook as a side dish, blanch in boiling water for 10 minutes, drain and refresh under cold running water, then chop or shred. Heat 1 tbsp olive oil with 1 crushed garlic clove in a frying pan over a
medium heat to infuse. Add blanched cavolo nero and stir-fry for 3-4 minutes to heat through.

EASY IDEAS TO USE CAVOLO NERO

Cavolo Nero & Potato Frittata: Make a tasty frittata of potatoes, bacon and cavolo nero. Serve with crusty ciabatta bread.

Warm Potato, Cavolo Nero & Egg Salad: Toss warm, shredded, blanched cavolo nero with warm sautéed bacon and cooked, diced potatoes. Make a dressing of olive oil, balsamic vinegar, wholegrain mustard and runny honey. Divide salad between serving bowls; serve topped with a lightly poached egg.

Cavolo Nero Potato Cakes: Combine mashed potatoes with 1 finely diced, cooked onion, a little Parmesan cheese and finely shredded, blanched cavolo nero. Allow mixture to cool, then shape into cakes, roll in flour and shallow-fry for 4-5 minutes each side.

Tuscan Winter Pesto: Use this robust garlicky dark green winter pesto tossed through pasta, beans or vegetables, as a topping for bruschetta or as a flavour boost for vegetable soups. A herbaceous olive oil such as the locally produced Village Press Manzanillo is
ideal for this pesto. Wash 1 bunch (about 500g) cavolo nero in warm water. Remove tough centre stem and discard. Bring a large
saucepan of water to the boil, add 1 tbsp salt and cavolo nero and cook for 10-15 minutes or until tender. Drain and refresh under cold running water. Squeeze out as much excess moisture as possible.  Place cavolo nero with 2 roughly chopped garlic cloves and ½ cup
extra virgin olive oil in a food processor and process to make a paste. This pesto will keep in a covered container in then fridge for 3-5 days.

This recipe owes much to the wonderful Italian cook Faith Willinger and a recipe very similar to this can be found in her book Red, White & Greens – The Italian Way with Vegetables (Harper Collins 1996). A raw version can also be made, but you will need to increase the oil to about ¾ cup.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipes by and information complied by Rachel Blackmore

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