Tag Archives: bok choy

Bok Choy with Velvet Chicken

Bok Choy with Velvet Chicken

This Chinese method of cooking chicken results in juicy, succulent meat, just like velvet in the mouth. The chicken is creamy white and quite different in texture and colour to usual stir-fried chicken
dishes.

The bok choy I used was slightly larger than baby, so I kept the leaves whole, but if your bok choy is larger, cut into large pieces.

Bok Choy with Velvet Chicken

Serve over steamed rice – I used brown rice which is my preface, but use white if you prefer.

Chinese (Shao Hsing) rice wine is available from Asian supermarkets and adds a unique flavour to many Chinese dishes – dry sherry can be used
instead, but I think it is well worth investing in a bottle of this inexpensive ingredient to have in the pantry to use in Chinese dishes.

Serves 4

cornflour
1 egg white, lightly beaten
Chinese (Shao Hsing) rice wine
sea salt
vegetable oil
500g boneless, skinless chicken thigh fillets or breasts, cut into large pieces
¼ cup chicken stock
1 tbsp soy sauce
ground white pepper
6 green onions, chopped
1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
pinch dried red pepper flakes, or to taste
1 bunch bok choy, base trimmed and leaves separated

1              Place 1 tbsp cornflour, egg white and 2 tsp rice wine in a bowl and mix to combine to make a smooth mixture, add a grind of salt and 1 tbsp oil. Add chicken and mix. Set aside to marinate for 30 seconds.

2              In a separate bowl combine 1 tsp cornflour, stock, soy sauce and 2 tbsp rice wine. Season with a grind of white pepper. Set aside.

3              Place a large saucepan of water over a medium heat and bring to the boil. Reduce heat and stir in 1 tbsp oil. With water
barely simmering, carefully add chicken and stir gently so the pieces don’t clump together. Cook for 1-2 minutes or until chicken is opaque, but not cooked through. Remove chicken from water and drain in a colander.

4              Heat a wok or large frying pan over a high heat. Add a splash oil, half the green onions, ginger and red pepper flakes and stir-fry for 10 seconds or until fragrant. Add bok choy and stir-fry for 1-2 minutes or until tender-crisp. Add chicken and stock mixture and stir-fry for 4-5 minutes or until chicken is cooked through and sauce thickens. Serve scattered with remaining green onions.

So tell me, have you ever tried this method of cooking chicken?

Where did the ingredients for this dish come from:
Chicken: Mad Butcher – Hastings; Bok choy, green onions: Krismaw Gardens – Hastings; Dried red pepper flakes – smoked chipotle flake: Orcona Chillis ‘n Peppers – Hastings; Egg: Verry Eggs –
Napier; Store Cupboard Ingredients: vegetable oil, salt, white
pepper, stock, cornflour, soy sauce, ginger, rice wine

Note: Many of these producers can be found at the Napier Urban Food Market each Saturday morning and/or at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’
Market each Sunday morning.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Seared Tuna with Orange Braised Bok Choy

Seared Tuna with Orange Braised Bok ChoyI love this description of tuna on the WWF site “If fish were like cars, tuna would be the Ferraris of the ocean—sleek, powerful, and made for speed. Their torpedo-shaped bodies streamline their movement through water, and their special swimming muscles enable them to cruise the ocean highways with great efficiency.”

While we do see tuna quite often it is usually very expensive, so when I see albacore which is a smaller species and while used
extensively for canning when sold fresh is usually less expensive, as it was the other day at Tangaroa Seafoods. Because of its smaller size albacore is often sold as fillet pieces rather than how the larger tuna species are sold, as steaks.

Seared Tuna with Orange Braised Bok Choy

With their Asian flavours serve the tuna and bok choy over steamed rice – I like brown rice, but white or brown work equally well.

Serves 2

2 tuna steaks or pieces of fillet – each about 150g
sea salt and black pepper
vegetable oil
sesame oil
ORANGE BRAISED BOK CHOY
1 orange
1 bunch baby bok choy, trimmed
SOY CORIANDER SAUCE
1 green onion, thinly sliced
2 tbsp soy sauce
1 tsp apple cider vinegar
¼ tsp honey
pinch dried chilli flakes
2 tbsp chopped fresh coriander

1              For the bok choy, squeeze juice from orange. Place bok choy, orange juice and a few drop of sesame oil in a saucepan, add a splash of water and season with a grind of salt and pepper. Cover and cook over a low heat for 15 minutes or until bok choy is wilted.

2              For the sauce, place green onion, soy sauce, vinegar, honey, chilli flakes and a few drops of sesame oil in a small bowl and whisk to combine. Just prior to serving, stir in coriander.

3              Heat a heavy-based frying pan over a high heat, season tuna with salt. Add a good splash of oil to the pan, add tuna and cook for 1-2 minutes each side to sear and cooked to your liking.

4              To serve, add half the sauce to the cooked bok choy and toss. Divide bok choy between serving plates, top with tuna and drizzle with remaining sauce.

So tell me, is tuna readily available in your part of the world and if, so which species do you see most often?

Where did the ingredients for this dish come from:
Tuna: Tangaroa Seafoods – Napier; Coriander: The Chef’s Garden @ Epicurean – Hastings; Bok choy, green onion: Krismaw Gardens – Hastings; Honey: The Naked Honey Pot – Taradale; Apple cider vinegar: Te Koha Organics – Hastings; Dried chilli flakes: Orcona
Chillis ‘n Peppers
– Hastings; From the garden: orange; Store
Cupboard Ingredients:
salt, soy sauce, vegetable oil, sesame oil.

Note: Many of these producers can be found at the Napier Urban Food Market each Saturday morning and/or at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’
Market each Sunday morning.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Smoked Salmon on a Bed of Bok Choy & Mushrooms

Smoked Salmon on a Bed of Bok Choy and Mushrooms_aThis sounds rather fancy, but is easy as! And not only do I love the flavours, but the way the colours pop off the plate is also arresting – an easy dish that is sure to impress.

Smoked Salmon on a Bed of Bok Choy & Mushrooms

Serves 4

6 baby bok choy, trimmed and leaves separated
1 small onion, sliced
vegetable oil
500g button mushrooms, thinly sliced
2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
1 small red chilli, seeded (optional) and sliced
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
500g smoked salmon fillet, skin and bones removed, flesh flaked

1              Bring a large saucepan of water to the boil, add salt to taste, add bok choy and blanch briefly. Drain bok choy in a colander and refresh under cold running water.

2              Place onion and a good splash of oil in a frying pan over a
medium heat, cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 8-10 minutes or until onion softens. Add mushrooms, cover and cook, stirring
occasionally, for 4-5 minutes or until mushrooms release their
juices, remove lid and let juices evaporate.

3              Add garlic and chilli and cook, stirring, for 2-3 minutes or
until fragrant. Add bok choy to pan and toss to combine. Season to taste with salt and black pepper.

4              Pile bok choy mixture onto a serving platter or divide
between individual plates, then top with smoked salmon. Serve at room temperature.

Where did the ingredients for this dish come from:
Salmon: Tangaroa Seafoods – Napier; Onion, garlic: Krismaw
Gardens
– Hastings; Mushrooms: Te Mata Mushrooms – Havelock North; Bok choy: Epicurean Supplies – Hastings; Chilli: Orcona – Hastings; Store Cupboard Ingredients: vegetable oil, sea salt, black pepper.

Note: Many of these producers can be found at the Napier Urban Food Market each Saturday morning and/or at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’
Market each Sunday morning.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Asian-flavoured Beef Broth

Asian Beef Broth_aA week or so ago Raymund over at Ang Sarp posted a recipe for Sup Tulang (Beef Bone Soup). I loved the combination of flavours in Raymund’s recipe and the other day when it was a bit gloomy I remembered about this comforting sounding dish.

So when I saw that I had some beef spare ribs and cross-cut blade steak in the freezer, I decided to do my take on Raymund’s recipe – so thanks Raymund for the inspiration and great flavours and I hope you don’t think I have mucked with your recipe too much!

Asian-flavoured Beef Broth

I used new potatoes because they are in-season and they worked
perfectly, but use whatever potatoes are available.

The meat should be tender enough that you can cut it with a spoon and if your beef ribs are nice and meaty, as mine were, there will be some quite big pieces of meat, but if it is really tender it won’t be a problem.

Serves 6-8

1 tbsp vegetable oil
1 large onion, quartered
1 thumb sized piece ginger, thinly sliced
4 cloves garlic, minced
2 Bird’s eye chillies, sliced (optional)
2 tbsp ground coriander
1 tbsp ground cumin
1 stick cinnamon
4 cardamom pods, crushed
1 star anise
about 800g meaty beef spare ribs
about 750g cross-cut blade, cut into largish pieces
freshly ground black pepper
2 cups beef stock
2 medium carrots, sliced
500g potatoes, cubedfreshly ground black pepper
2 stalks celery, sliced
4 baby bok choy, stems separated
fish sauce, to taste

1              Place oil and onion in a large saucepan over a medium heat, cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 8-10 minutes or until onion softens.

2              Add garlic, ginger and chillies and cook, stirring, for 1-2 minutes longer or until fragrant. Add coriander, cumin, cinnamon, cardamom and star anise and stir-fry for 1 minute.

3              Add spare ribs and beef and turn to coat with spice mixture. Add a good grind of pepper, the pour in stock and about 6 cups
water or enough to cover the meat and bones, cover and bring to simmering. Reduce heat and simmer for 1½-2 hours or until beef is tender and meat is falling off the ribs. Fish out any pieces of the hard spices – cinnamon, star anise, cardamom – that you can see, don’t get fussed about this, but when you serve, just warn your diners.

4              Add potatoes and carrots, bring back to simmering and
simmer for 10 minutes. Add celery and simmer for 10 minutes
longer or until vegetables are tender.

5              Add boy choy and simmer, for 3-4 minutes longer or until just wilted. Season with fish sauce – I used 2 tbsp, but like seasoning with salt, this is going to depend on your personal taste – and
additional pepper, if necessary. To serve, ladle into bowls.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe adapted by Rachel Blackmore

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Korean-style Sesame Pak Choy

Korean-style Bok ChoyThis is my take on a recipe I saw over on Maangchi the other day.

I love this website for information on Korean cooking and food,
because not only does it have great Korean recipes which can be made by home cooks, but it also has great information about Korean ingredients (with pictures, which is really useful when in the Asian food store, as it seems as if we have the same brands as Maangchi in New York).

There is also a really helpful Beginner’s Guide, so if like me you have taken an interest in this cuisine this certainly a great site to check out.

Locally grown organic baby bok choy from Epicurean Supplies.

Locally grown organic baby bok choy from Epicurean Supplies.

Korean-style Sesame Pak Choy

Maangchi says that if she was in Korean she would use cabbage or sweet potato stems and I can imagine that this would be a delicious way to
prepare cabbage.

In Maangchi’s recipe she uses garlic and a green onion, but as I still had some of the lovely green garlic I got at the market last weekend I used that instead.

Maangchi also serves this as a cold dish, but I served mine at room temperature.

Serves 4-6

6-8 baby bok choy
2 stalks green garlic
2 tbsp fermented soybean paste (doenjang)
1-2 tsp hot pepper paste (gochujang), or to taste
2 tsp sesame oil
2 tsp sesame seeds

1              Cut base off bok choy, separate leaves and wash well under cold running water. I had baby choy so left the leaves whole, but if using more mature bok choy cut into pieces as Maangchi suggests.

2              Bring a large saucepan of water to the boil and blanch bok choy until white stems soften. Drain well.

3              Place green garlic, soy bean paste, hot pepper paste and
sesame oil in a bowl and mix well with a wooden spoon.

4              Add bok choy with a very little of the cooking water to the paste and toss to combine. Serve scattered with sesame seeds.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe adapted by Rachel Blackmore

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Ginger & Soy-marinated Kingfish

Ginger & Soy Kingfish 004a

Looking at a plate like this makes me proud to call Hawke’s Bay home and reminds me what a wonderful range of food we have available to us in this region.

The beautiful fresh shiitake mushroom is from Hillcroft, the pak choy from Epicurean Supplies, both grown right here in Hawke’s Bay. The kingfish is from Tangaroa Seafoods and has been caught off a boat that calls Napier home.

As I did a couple of weeks ago I oven-roasted the shiitake
mushrooms
– I managed to get these beautiful big ones at the
Napier Urban Food Market the other day so only needed one per serve and, because of the other flavours in this dish, used vegetable oil not olive oil as in the original recipe.

After removing the fish from the marinade, I added the pak choy to it, gave it a quick toss, then once the fish was cooked added it with the marinade to the same pan and quickly stir-fried.

Dinner on the table from start to finish in just 30 minutes – now that’s how to beat the takeaway.

Ginger & Soy-marinated Kingfish

Serves 4

4 (about 150g each) kingfish steaks
vegetable oil
GINGER & SOY MARINADE
3 tbsp soy sauce
2 tbsp fresh lemon juice
1 tbsp fish sauce
3 tbsp chopped fresh coriander
2 tbsp grated fresh ginger
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
1 Bird’s eye chilli, sliced

1              For marinade, place soy sauce, lemon juice, fish sauce,
coriander, ginger, garlic and chilli, if using, in a bowl and whisk to combine. Whisk in 2 tbsp vegetable oil.

2              Add fish steaks, to marinade, turn to coat, cover and set aside to marinate at room temperature for 20-30 minutes.

3              Heat a heavy-based frying pan over a medium-heat high, add a little vegetable oil and swirl to coat base of pan, heat until
shimmering.

4              Add fish to pan and cook for 3-4 minutes each side or until just cooked through. Remove from pan, cover and stand for 2-3 minutes before serving.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Other kingfish recipes to try:

Kingfish with Leeks, Lime and Coriander

Kingfish with Leeks, Lime and Coriander

Kingfish with Lemon & Coriander Vinaigrette

Kingfish with Lemon & Coriander Vinaigrette

Seared Kingfish with Sesame & Ginger Broad Bean Salad

Seared Kingfish with Sesame & Ginger Broad Bean Salad

 

Spicy Sesame & Garlic Pak Choy

Spicy Sesame & Garlic Pak Choy 001a

As regular readers know I find it hard to resist fresh produce and no more so than when it is the first of the season, as was the beautiful pak choy (also known as bok choy) I spotted on the Epicurean
Supplies
stall at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’ Market.

Great used in stir-fries and Asian-style soups it is also excellent cooked as a vegetable in its own right as I have done here.

Spicy Sesame & Garlic Pak Choy

This is a simple preparation which showcases the main ingredient – pak choy.

A pinch of dried red chilli flakes could be used in place of the fresh chilli.

Serves 4

4 young pak choy
2 tbsp vegetable oil
2 cloves garlic clove, finely chopped
1 tbsp grated ginger
1 Bird’s eye chilli, sliced, seeded (optional)
1 tbsp Thai fish sauce
1 tbsp toasted sesame oil
2 tsp sesame seeds

1              Prepare pak choy, by cutting a thick slice from the base.
Separate stems, rinse well and shake dry.

2              Place vegetable oil, garlic, ginger, chilli and fish sauce in a wok or frying pan over a medium-high heat and cook, stirring, for 1-2 minutes or until fragrant. Add pak choy, toss to combine, cover and cook, tossing occasionally, for 5-6 minutes or until leaves are wilted and stems tender crisp.

3              Remove pan from heat, drizzle with sesame oil and toss. Serve scattered with sesame seeds.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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