Tag Archives: beef

Beef, Broccoli & Shiitake Mushroom Sauté

Beef, Broccoli & Shiitake SauteAs regular readers know I love the fresh organic shiitake
mushrooms that are available from JJ’s Organics at the Napier
Urban Food Market
. Last weekend they also had some lovely sprouting broccoli and the two just seemed to be made to go
together. Then I picked up some lovely rump steak and that was
dinner.

Beef, Broccoli & Shiitake Mushroom Sauté

If shiitake mushrooms are not available you could make this dish with Portabellas – you will need to adjust the cooking time as they give off more moisture than shiitake.

Serves 4

300-400g sprouting broccoli or 1 head broccoli (about 300g), cut into florets
vegetable oil
1 onion, sliced
1 cup sliced fresh shiitake mushrooms
1 tbsp cornflour
1 tsp Chinese five-spice
sea salt and black pepper
500g rump steak, cut into strips
¼ cup Chinese cooking wine
1 tsp fish sauce
1 clove garlic, crushed

1              Boil, steam or microwave broccoli until just tender. Drain and rinse under cold running water to stop cooking. Set aside.

2              Place onion and a little oil in a frying pan, cover and cook over a medium heat, stirring occasionally for 8-10 minutes or until onion softens. Remove onion and set aside, leaving as much oil as possible in the pan.

3              Heat oil remaining in pan over a medium-high heat, add mushrooms and cook, tossing, for 4-5 minutes or until golden.
Remove and set aside.

4              Combine cornflour, five spice powder and a good grind of salt and pepper in a bowl and mix to combine. Add beef and toss to coat.

5              Add a little more oil to the pan, heat over a high heat, add beef and cook, tossing for 3-4 minutes or beef browns and is almost cooked.

6              Return onion and mushrooms to pan with broccoli and garlic and toss to combine. Stir in rice wine, fish sauce and ¼ cup water and cook, tossing, to heat through and thicken sauce.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Other recipes using fresh shiitake mushrooms you might like to try:

Chicken, Fresh Shiitake Mushroom & Tatsoi Stir-fry

Chicken, Fresh Shiitake Mushroom & Tatsoi Stir-fry

Oven-Roasted Shiitake Mushrooms

Oven-Roasted Shiitake Mushrooms

 

Spicy Beef with Glass Noodles

Spicy Beef & Noodles 009a

Glass, cellophane or bean thread noodles are made from mung bean or green pea flour. These very thin, noodles are white when dry, but on soaking magically become transparent and glassy.

Gluten- and wheat-free these delicate noodles should just be soaked not actively boiled otherwise they might dissolve and disappear!

These delicious, slightly chewy noodles are available in dried blocks from Asian food stores and some supermarkets – if you are not sure, if you have the right noodles, check the ingredients to make sure they are made from mung bean or green pea flour or starch.

Spicy Beef with Glass Noodles

The noodles can be long and a bit unmanageable, but are made more manageable if cut in several places after soaking and before tossing through the meat and vegetable mixture.

Serves 4

250g beef mince
2 garlic cloves, crushed
1 tbsp ginger, freshly grated
1 Bird’s eye chilli, sliced
2 tbsp tarmari (gluten-free soy sauce)
2 tbsp rice wine
200g glass, cellophane or bean thread noodles
vegetable oil
1 onion, thinly sliced
1 red capsicum, thinly sliced
125g button mushrooms, thinly sliced
¼ cup chopped coriander

1              Place mince, garlic, ginger, chilli, tarmari and rice wine in a bowl and mix to combine. Set aside to marinate for at least 10 minutes.

2              Place noodles in a bowl, pour over boiling water and set aside to soak for 5 minutes or until soft and transparent. Drain, rinse under cold running water, drain again and set aside.

3              Heat a large frying pan over a medium-high heat. Add a little oil, swirl to coat base of pan and heat. Add onion and cook, stirring frequently, for 4-5 minutes or until onion softens.

4              Add beef mixture and cook, stirring, for 3-4 minutes or until beef browns. Add capsicum and mushrooms and cook, stirring
frequently, for 5 minutes longer.

5              Add noodles and cook, tossing, for 2-3 minutes or until well mixed and heated through. Add coriander, reserving a little for
garnishing, if desired, and toss again.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Madras Beef Curry

Beef Madras 007aMadras curry takes its name from the city that was known as Madras, now called Chennai, in southern India.

As this recipe shows making your own curry paste doesn’t have to be hard. But best of all you can control the heat of the paste and it just tastes so much better than packet mixes. If you have the time, roast the whole spices – coriander and cumin – then grind them for the curry paste, you will surprised at what a difference it makes.

Madras Beef Curry

Control the degree of chilli heat in this dish by the amount of chilli
powder you use in the paste – the amount I have suggested gives a
fragrant, bold but not overly hot curry.

The curry paste can be used with other foods such as chicken, vegetables or lentils, the cooking will vary depending on the base ingredient you are using.

Serves 6

2 tbsp vegetable oil
1 kg stewing or casserole beef, cut into 2.5 cm cubes
sea salt
2 tbsp tomato paste
2 cups beef stock
natural yogurt, to serve
fresh coriander, to serve
MADRAS CURRY PASTE
2 tbsp ground coriander
1 tbsp ground cumin
1 tsp turmeric
½-1 tsp chilli powder, or to taste, (optional)
2 garlic cloves, crushed
2 tsp grated fresh ginger
freshly ground black pepper
¼ cup lemon juice

1              To make the Curry Paste, place ground coriander, cumin,
turmeric, chilli powder, garlic, ginger and a good grind of black
pepperin a small bowl. Mix in lemon juice to make a paste. Set aside.

2              Heat a heavy-based saucepan over a medium-heat high, add oil and heat until shimmering. Season beef with sea salt and brown in batches, if necessary.

3              Return all meat to pan, add curry paste and mix well to coat meat.

4              Stir in tomato paste and stock, bring to the boil, reduce heat, cover and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 1½-2 hours or until meat is tender. The exact cooking time will depend on the cut of meat used, as I used shin beef, on this occasion, the cooking time was nearly 3 hours, but cuts such as cross-cut blade and chuck will easily cook in the time I have given above. Remove lid and simmer for 15-20 minutes or until sauce thickens and reduces slightly.

5              Serve topped with a dollop of yogurt, scattered with fresh coriander and accompanied by steamed rice and a steamed seasonal vegetable of your choice.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Other Indian-style curries you might like to try:

Home-style Indian Chicken Curry

Home-style Indian Chicken Curry

Tomato, Capsicum & Potato Curry

Tomato, Capsicum & Potato Curry

Easy Lamb Biryani

Easy Lamb Biryani

 

 

 

 

Harissa Braised Beef with Preserved Lemon

Harissa Beef - 013aIn this dish, tender, melt-in-the-mouth beef sits in a harissa
flavoured broth to make a satisfying spring meal – light and
refreshing, but with warmth to ward off the chill that is still in the air here in Hawke’s Bay.

Harissa Braised Beef with Preserved Lemon

I used shin beef, but any stewing or casseroling meat can be used, blade, flank or chuck, are also good options.

Serves 4

olive oil
500g stewing beef, cut into 2.5cm pieces
1 medium onion, chopped
3 tbsp Orcona harissa paste
2 tbsp diced preserved lemon
1 clove garlic, chopped
2 tsp ground cumin
2 tsp ground coriander
3 cups beef stock
¼ cup chopped fresh coriander
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

1              Preheat oven to 160°C.

2              Heat a large oven- and flameproof casserole dish over a high heat. Add a little oil, swirl to cover base of dish and brown meat in batches. As meat browns remove and set aside.

3              Reduce heat to medium, add onion, cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 8-10 minutes or until onion softens. Add harissa, preserved lemon, garlic, cumin and ground coriander and cook,
stirring, for 1-2 minutes longer or until fragrant.

4              Return beef to pan and mix to coat beef with spice mixture. Stir in stock and bring to simmering. Cover, transfer to oven and cook, stirring occasionally, for 2 hours or until beef is tender.  Season to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Just prior to
serving, stir in most of the fresh coriander, reserving some for
garnishing.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Creamy Mushroom & Bacon Mince

Creamy Mushroom & Bacon Mince 031aLooking for a different way to serve economical and versatile mince? This recipe has all the flavours and creaminess of beef stroganoff at a fraction of the cost.

Creamy Mushroom & Bacon Mince

Sour cream can be used instead of crème fraiche or if dairy is a problem, omit it – you will still have a great dish, but it just won’t have the
creaminess.

Serves 4

1 onion, chopped
olive or vegetable oil
2 rashers bacon, chopped
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2 sticks celery, finely chopped
250g button mushrooms, chopped
500g beef mince
400g can diced tomatoes
1 cup beef stock
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
200g tub crème fraîche ½ cup chopped fresh parsley

1              Place onion and a little oil in a heavy-based frying pan over a medium heat, cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 8-10 minutes or until onion starts to soften.

2              Add bacon and cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes. Add garlic and celery and cook for 2-3 minutes. Add mushrooms, cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes longer or until
mushrooms give up their juices. Remove lid and cook, stirring
frequently, for 4-5 minutes or until mushroom juices evaporate.

3              Increase heat, add mince, mix to combine and break up meat. Cook, without stirring, for 4-5 minutes or until mince starts to brown. Give a good mix and cook, without stirring, for 4-5 minutes longer or until mince browns.

4              Mix in tomatoes and stock, bring to simmering, cover and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 30 minutes or until mixture looks and tastes rich and delicious. Remove lid and simmer, stirring
occasionally, for 5-10 minutes until any excess liquid evaporates.

5              Season with a good grind of salt and pepper. Stir in crème fraîche and most of the parsley, reserving some for garnish.

Serving suggestion: Serve over polenta, mashed or baked potatoes, pasta or on slices of thick toast with a steamed green vegetable of your choice or a salad of mixed leaves.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Other mince recipes you might like to try:

Spicy Lentils & Mince Lettuce Wraps

Spicy Lentils & Mince Lettuce Wraps

Spicy Beef Empanadas

Spicy Beef Empanadas

Sloppy Joes with Mushrooms & Spinach

Sloppy Joes with Mushrooms & Spinach

Bulgogi

Bulgogi 003aThis is my version of a popular and well-known Korean dish and is another example of the simplicity of Korean cuisine. The more I
explore Korean cuisine the more it seems to be a cuisine designed for busy people.

Translated bul means meat and gogi fire so in Korean bulgogi (bul-go-gi) means fire meat which appears to refer to its cooking method which is traditionally grilling on a metal plate in a brazier, rather than the spiciness of the dish. Today pan-cooking is common, but it is a dish that can be cooked successfully on the barbecue.

One of the ways Koreans eat bulgogi is with a small quantity of steamed rice and accompaniments wrapped in a lettuce leaf.

Bulgogi

Serves 4

2 large onions – 1 chopped, 1 cut into thin wedges
1 nashi or pear, cored and chopped
¼ cup water
2 tsp grated fresh ginger
1 clove garlic, crushed
¼ cup soy sauce
500g beef steak, thinly sliced – I used rump, but many recipes
suggest fillet sirloin or scotch fillet
1 tbsp sesame oil
vegetable oil
sesame seeds, to serve
sliced red chilli (optional), to serve

1              Place chopped onion, nashi or pear and water in a food
processor and process to make a puree. Transfer to a bowl. Add
ginger, garlic and soy sauce and mix to combine. Add beef and mix. Cover and marinate for at least 30 minutes – longer is fine. Add
sesame oil and mix to combine.

2              Heat a heavy-based frying pan over a high heat. Add a little oil, then cook beef with a little of the marinade, in batches, for 2- 3 minutes. Once each batch is cooked, remove and set aside.

3              Add onion wedges and any remaining marinade to pan and cook, tossing from time to time, for 4-5 minutes or until onion just starts to soften.  Return beef to pan and toss to combine and heat through. Serve scattered with sesame seeds and chilli slices.

Serving suggestion: Accompany with steamed rice, kimchi, Korean chilli paste (gochujang) and lettuce leaves for wrapping.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Another Korean-inspired dish you might like to try:

Spicy Korean Pork

Spicy Korean Pork

 

Korean-inspired Beef Casserole with Cabbage

Korean Beef Stew 007aFirst up, I am no authority on Korean cuisine and at best this dish is inspired by it. However, whenever I do eat or cook it I always find it tasty and interesting.

So I have decided that I am going to explore Korean food a bit more, so expect to some more dishes inspired by this cuisine in coming months.

A few things I have found out to date are:

  • Major ingredients include: sesame oil, soybean paste, soy sauce, salt, garlic and chilli pepper;
  • Korea is the largest consumer of garlic in the world – yes, ahead of Italy!;
  • As with some other Asian cuisines, all dishes are served at the same time;
  • Traditionally rice has been the staple food of Koreans;
  • Kimchi is a standard accompaniment with every meal; and
  • Food is usually eaten with chopsticks and a spoon.

Korean-inspired Beef Casserole with Cabbage

This dish is sweet, savoury, spicy, a little salty and just plain delicious – so give it a try.

You could simmer this on the stove top, but as I was going to be out for several hours I decided to put in the oven where it could look after
itself.

Serves 4

vegetable oil
4 pieces (150-200g each) bone-in shin beef
salt and freshly ground pepper
2 medium red onions, quartered
6 large garlic cloves, coarsely chopped
2 Bird’s chillies, sliced
¼ cup brown sugar
4 cups beef stock
¼ cup soy sauce
1 tbsp maize cornflour mixed with a little cold water
4 cups roughly chopped green cabbage
1 cup bean sprouts of your choice

1              Preheat oven to 160°C.

2              Season beef with salt. Heat a heavy-based, flame- and ovenproof casserole dish over a medium-high heat. Add just enough oil to cover the base of the pan. Add beef and cook for 3-4 minutes each side, to brown. Remove beef and set aside.

3              Reduce heat to medium, add onions, garlic and chillies to pan, cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 8-10 minutes or until onions just start to soften.

4              Add sugar and mix to combine. Stir in stock and soy sauce and bring to simmering. Return meat to pan, cover, transfer to the oven and cook for 2 hours or until meat is tender.

5              Remove meat from pan and set aside. Whisk cornflour
mixture into pan juices, add cabbage to pan and mix to combine.
Return meat to pan and return pan to the oven and cook for 30 minutes longer or until cabbage wilts. To serve, spoon into bowls and top with sprouts.

Serving suggestion: Serve over steamed brown or white rice, tossed with a drizzle of sesame oil and accompany with kimchi or Korean pickles of your choice.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Find out more about Korean Cuisine at TriFood.com

Beef & Dark Ale Casserole

Beef & Dark Ale Casserole 003aThis warming one pot casserole is one of the easiest you will ever come across. Everything, expect the peas, is put into the casserole and the oven does all the work.

I used Monteith’s Barrel Aged Porter which is a delicious dark beer which is influenced by the American oak pinot noir barrels it is aged in. The result is a rich, malty dark flavoured beer which is ideal for this recipe.

Beef & Dark Ale Casserole

Serves 8

1kg stewing or casseroling beef, in 2.5cm pieces – I used cross-cut blade
4 tbsp seasoned plain flour
440g can diced tomatoes
750g gourmet potatoes, halved or quartered, depending on the size
1 large (about 200g) onion, cut into wedges
2 cloves garlic, sliced
1 cup beef stock
500mL bottle dark ale
2 cups frozen peas salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

1              Preheat oven to 160°C.

2              Toss beef in flour and place in a large flame- and ovenproof casserole dish. Add tomatoes and mix to combine. Add potatoes,
onion, garlic, stock and ale and mix to combine. Cover dish with lid, place over a medium heat, and stirring occasionally, bring to
simmering.

3              Transfer dish to the oven and cook, stirring occasionally, for 2½-3 hours or until meat is tender.  Add peas and cook for 30 minutes longer. Season to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Other beef stews and casseroles you might like to try:

Dijon, Mushroom & Beef Stew

Dijon, Mushroom & Beef Stew

Beef, Bacon & Carrot Casserole

Beef, Bacon & Carrot Casserole

Asian Beef & Vegetable Stew

Asian Beef & Vegetable Stew

 

Beef, Bacon & Carrot Casserole

Shin Beef Casserole 012aShin beef is another of those economic cuts ideal for long slow
cooking.

In this recipe I have used slices of shin beef – sometimes called osso buco, though traditionally this refers to this cut of veal. In Italian osso buco means ‘hole with bone’ a reference to the delicious marrow filled hole at the centre of the cut.

Here in New Zealand where veal is not as common or inexpensive as it is said to be in other parts of the world, shin on the bone beef is a great alternative and any recipe calling for veal osso buco can easily be adapted.

Shin Beef Casserole 002aAs you can see the meat is beautifully marbled – this is connective tissue not fat and after long slow cooking becomes melt-in-the-mouth tender. Don’t discard the marrow in the centre of the bone – at the end of the cooking time some of this will have melted in the casserole and so enriching it, but there is usually a bit left there which is delicious to suck on – I think it is the best part and always hope not too much has disappeared during cooking.

Adding the sliced carrots in the last stage of cooking, add a vibrancy and sweetness to the dish. Don’t just think of the chopped parsley, added just prior to serving, as just a garnish, it also gives a freshness and lift to the dish – stir in before eating to really appreciate the added flavour.

Beef, Bacon & Carrot Casserole

For a hearty winter meal, serve over smashed or creamy mashed
potatoes or polenta with a green vegetable of your choice.

Serves 4

salt and freshly ground black pepper
4 slices (about 1kg) shin on the bone beef
olive oil
1 brown onion, diced
2 rashers bacon, diced
3 medium (about 150g) carrots – 1 diced; 2 cut into 2cm thick slices
2 sticks celery, sliced
3 cloves garlic, crushed
1 tsp dried mixed herbs or dried Italian herbs
2 tbsp flour
2 tbsp tomato paste
2 cups beef stock
chopped parsley (optional)

1              Preheat oven to 160°C.

2              Season beef with salt. Heat 2 tbsp oil in a heavy-based, flame- and ovenproof casserole dish over a medium high heat. Add beef and cook for 3-4 minutes each side, to brown – you may need to do this in batches. Remove beef and set aside.

3              Reduce heat to low, add onion and bacon and more oil, if
necessary, and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Add diced carrot, celery, garlic and mixed herbs and cook, stirring for 2 minutes. Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 8-10 minutes or until onion is soft and translucent.

4              Stir in flour and tomato paste and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Slowly stir in stock and bring to the boil, stirring constantly. Return meat to the pan, cover and transfer to the oven. Cook for 2 hours or until meat is tender. Add sliced carrots and cook for 30 minutes longer or until carrots are tender. Season to taste with salt and black pepper. Serve scattered with parsley, if desired.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Other beef casseroles and stews you might like to try:

Dijon, Mushroom & Beef Stew

Dijon, Mushroom & Beef Stew

Asian Beef & Vegetable Stew

Asian Beef & Vegetable Stew

Beef Cheeks Braised in Beer with Aromatic Spices

Beef Cheeks Braised in Beer with Aromatic Spices

 

Dijon, Mushroom & Beef Stew

Dijon Beef Stew 004aIt was with interest the other day I saw stewing and casserole steak advertised on special and there was a $1 price difference – the
stewing steak was $8.99 per kilo and the casserole steak $9.99 per kilo.

This, of course, got me thinking “What is the difference between the two?” When I was in buying the steak I decided that the stewing steak was the one I liked the look of the best – it was marbled and while the steak wasn’t labelled as any particular cut it looked like blade or chuck whereas the casserole steak had little marbling and looked to me like topside. So I thought “Well, that is interesting” and popped the cheaper, more appealing (to me) stewing steak in my basket. When I got to the counter, I asked the person on the
checkout what the difference between the types of steak was and I was basically told exactly what I had already worked out, so for this butcher at least there is a difference between what meat you should use for stewing and casseroling, I personally, think they are pretty much interchangeable and it depends of your preface.

Cuts such as shin, chuck, blade, brisket and flank (these were the cuts I was told that were stewing steak) come from hard-working
areas of the beast so contained a lot of connective tissue which when cooked slowly for a long time breaks down and becomes melt in the mouth.

The casserole cuts included topside and fresh silverside and are leaner and do not contain much connective tissue and are also used as slow-roasting cuts.

For more information about the different beef and lamb cuts visit Beef + Lamb New Zealand.

Dijon, Mushroom & Beef Stew

Adding the carrots towards the end of the cooking time means they
retain some firmness and give the stew a lovely carrot flavour that is lost if they are cooked with the meat from the beginning.

I used Masterfoods Dijonnaise mustard which is smooth and creamy and gives the stew the same qualities without using any cream.

Serves 6

olive oil
1 large (about 200g) onion, finely diced
2 sticks celery, sliced
750g stewing beef, in 2.5cm pieces
2 tbsp seasoned flour
2 cups beef stock
¼ cup Dijon-style mustard
1 tbsp  wholegrain mustard
2 large (about 200g each) carrots, halved lengthwise, sliced
butter
250g button mushrooms, quartered
¼ cup chopped flat-leaf parsley
salt and freshly ground black pepper

1              Place 2 tbsp oil, onion and celery in a heavy-based saucepan over a medium heat, cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 8-10 minutes or until onion is translucent. Remove and set aside.
2              Toss meat in flour to coat. Increase heat and add a little more oil to the pan, then brown meat in batches. Once browned remove and set aside with the onion mixture.
3              Add some of the stock to the pan and cook, stirring, to
deglaze and loosen any bits from the bottom. Stir in remaining stock and mustards and whisk to blend.
4              Return onion mixture and meat to the pan, cover, bring to simmering and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 1½-2 hours or until meat is tender.
5              Add carrots, bring back to simmering and simmer for 45 minutes longer or carrots are tender.
6              Meanwhile, melt a knob of butter in a frying pan over a medium heat, add mushrooms and sauté for 10-15 minutes or until brown and tender.
7              Stir mushrooms into the meat mixture, bring back to
simmering and simmer for 10 minutes longer. Stir in parsley and
season to taste with salt and black pepper

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Other beef stews and casseroles you might like to try:

Asian Beef & Vegetable Stew

Asian Beef & Vegetable Stew

Beef Cheeks Braised in Red Wine

Beef Cheeks Braised in Red Wine

Red Capsicum, Leek & Black Pepper Beef Casserole

Red Capsicum, Leek & Black Pepper Beef Casserole