Category Archives: Where I’m Shopping

Free-from Bacon, Leek & Egg Pie

Free-from Bacon, Leek & Egg PieOne of my earliest cooking memories is of my mother making bacon and egg pies, she run them up at the drop of a hat – whether it was to feed the shearers, the haymakers, for a family or school sports day picnic and, of course, they were always an important part of the
tailgate picnic at the yearly A&P Show.

Mother’s bacon and egg pies were simple. They started with a 400g block of thawed, frozen puff pastry which she cut about one-third to two-thirds. She rolled out the larger portion and placed it on a large
baking tray. The pastry was covered with rashers of bacon which were topped with slices of tomatoes, over which whole eggs were cracked (the eggs were always left whole – yolks intact), then
everything was seasoned with a good grind of black pepper. Finally the remaining pastry was rolled out and placed over the ingredients and the edges rolled to enclose the filling. The pie was brushed with an egg wash and baked. More often than not, the pie was served warm or at room temperature, cut into large pieces and eaten in the hand.

The basic filling of Mother’s pie could have other things added
depending on the occasion and time of year – a little very finely chopped onion, only a little and very finely chopped, Mother was not keen on huge quantities of onion and never used garlic, sliced
potato, peas and my favourite was when the base of the pie was lined with sausage meat, these are just some of the variations I
remember.

As regular readers know I love new season’s produce and new
products, so I was very excited a few weeks ago when Rob from Wild Game Salamis told me he would have bacon soon – the
message went out last weekend that the bacon was ready and would only be available at the Wild Game Salamis shop on Sunday (their shop is only open on Sunday).

The deliciously smoky Wild Game Salamis Bacon – stunning!

The deliciously smoky Wild Game Salamis Bacon – stunning!

So on Sunday night I had thoughts of my Mother’s bacon and egg pie to show off this stunning bacon – one big problem when I went to the freezer I only had one sheet of ready-rolled puff pastry and I wasn’t going to start making my own puff pastry at 6pm at night! So this open, free-form pie was born.

Free-from Bacon, Leek & Egg Pie

Serves 2

1 leek, sliced
olive oil
1 sheet frozen ready-rolled puffed pastry, thawed
4-6 rashers streaky bacon, rind removed
1 tomato, sliced
2 eggs

1              Preheat oven to 200°C

2              Place leeks and a good splash of oil in a frying pan over a
medium heat, cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 8-10 minutes or until leeks are soft. Remove from heat and allow to cool slightly.

3              Meanwhile, line a baking tray with baking paper and place the pastry sheet in the centre. Arrange bacon in a single layer in the centre of the pastry. Top with tomato slices and cooked leeks. Cut corners off pastry to form a rough circle. Fold up edges, and pleat to enclose filling.

4              Make two hollows in leek mixture and break eggs carefully into hollows. Bake for 20-25 minutes, until eggs are set. Serve hot, warm or at room temperature, scattered with parsley and
accompanied by a salad of mixed leaves.

Where did the ingredients for this dish come from:
Bacon: Wild Game Salamis – Clive; Leek, parsley: The Chef’s Garden @ Epicurean – Hastings; Tomatoes: Krismaw Gardens – Hastings; Eggs: Verry Best Eggs – Napier; Olive oil: The Village Press – Hastings; Store Cupboard Ingredients: pastry.

Note: Many of these producers can be found at the Napier Urban Food Market each Saturday morning and/or at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’
Market each Sunday morning.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Roasted Potato, Capsicum & Bacon Salad

Roast Potato, Capsicum & Bacon Salad

This dish came about because I had some bacon in the fridge that needed using – doesn’t happen often, but somehow it just hadn’t been used.

Some of the capsicum 'seconds'!

Some of the capsicum ‘seconds’!

I also had a bag of lovely capsicums which I had picked up at the
market last weekend – “you realise they are seconds” the grower said to me. I have no objections to seconds especially when they are at a good price and you know that they will be used within a few days. This so called bag of seconds were beautiful fruit – the
differences between them and the ‘firsts’? A bit smaller and not quite so perfectly shaped.

Buying seconds in-season is a great way to save on food costs and it is a win-win – you get produce at a good price and the grower or producer receives at least something for all the effort which has gone in producing even the “seconds”.

I recently came across a lovely blog called City Hippy Farm Girl
author Brydie lives in Sydney and says about her blog “…this is a blog about trying to live a simple life, city style.”

When I was looking through Brydie’s blog I saw her “Eat Local
Challenge” and this really made me connect with her as eating
locally and seasonally is something I am passionate about.

Whenever possible I buy from local farmers, growers and producers – to see why read one of my early posts Six Reasons to Shop at Your Farmers’ Market and while this post is specific to Farmers’ Markets you can see how the same principals can be applied to the wider community.

Inspired by Brydie and her “Eat Local Challenge” I am now going to include at the end of each recipe where the ingredients came from – this is one small way I can acknowledge and thank our wonderful
local farmers, growers and producers.

For those who do not know Hawke’s Bay, where I live, we are very lucky to have a wonderful climate which means we have a good
supply of local produce year round, it is, however, seasonal.

We also have two Farmers’ Markets held every weekend, several other seasonal markets and numerous farm shops and Napier, one of the two cities in the area, is by the sea and there are a number of fishing boats which call it home, so we also have a ready source of seafood.

Store cupboard items are those that are not grown or produced
locally, but I usually purchase them from local speciality food stores such as Vetro or Bellantio’s – both of which are locally owned and operated – and if possible will chose New Zealand made, grown or produced over imported.

I know my challenge to “Eat Local” is much easier than Brydie’s and many others.

For those who do not know Hawke’s Bay check out this map. I live in Clive – Hastings, Napier and Havelock North, the three main
shopping centres are only a 10-minute drive away and I pass many farm shops whichever direction I drive in.

Find out more about Hawke’s Bay and what it is like.

Roasted Potato, Capsicum & Bacon Salad

Serves 4

500g new potatoes, left whole, halved or quartered, depending on the size
4 large capsicums, thickly sliced – I used 2 red and 2 yellow
4 rashers middle bacon, cut into thick strips
olive oil
sea salt
balsamic vinegar
shredded basil

1              Preheat oven to 200°C.

2              Place potatoes, capsicum and bacon in a bowl and toss to combine. Drizzle with olive oil and toss again to coat vegetables with oil. Tip vegetables onto a baking tray and spread out evenly. Roast for 30 minutes, tossing after 15 minutes, or until potatoes are cooked.

3              Transfer cooked vegetables to a serving bowl, drizzle with vinegar, scatter with basil and toss to combine. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Where did the ingredients for this dish come from:
Potatoes: JJ’s Organics – Napier; Capsicums: Krismaw Gardens – Hastings; Bacon: Holly Bacon Company – Hastings; Olive oil: The Village Press – Hastings; Basil: The Chef’s Garden @ Epicurean – Hastings; Store Cupboard Ingredients: balsamic vinegar, sea salt

Note: Many of the local producers can be found at the Napier Urban Food Market each Saturday morning and/or at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’ Market each Sunday morning.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Persiana – Recipes from the Middle East & beyond

Persiana

It has finally arrived – that is my ordered copy of Persiana – Recipes from the Middle East & beyond by Sabrina Ghayour (Mitchell Beazley 2014).

Back in early July last year Amanda at Glamorous Glutton reviewed this book and told us about an event that she had been to with the author – I immediately knew I wanted this book, so sent off an email to my very good independent bookshop Beattie & Forbes in Napier.

In subsequent conversations, concerning this book, I was told it had to be ordered from Australia and that things from the particular
distributor can take a little while – ‘Fine’ I said and so started my wait which came to an end last week when I received an email
advising me that Persiana had arrived – I was so excited.

I picked it up after shopping at the Napier Urban Food Market on Saturday morning, then several things occurred which confirmed that I am meant to have this book:

  • I got in the car, ripped off the wrapping and the book immediately fell open at the recipe for Bandari Monkfish Tails – we were on our way over the hill to Tangaroa Seafoods to buy fish! ‘Yum’ I said that’s what we are having for dinner – thinking I will use
    whatever suitable fish they have.
  • We arrive at Tangaroa Seafoods and the first fish I see as I walk in the door is monkfish!
  • I had just purchased a beautiful bunch of organic coriander from JJ’s Organics at the market and could have also got dill (but
    haven’t got the book at that stage – so didn’t!)

So you see what I mean – this is the only recipe I have cooked from Persiana so far, but it is so full recipes for the sort of food that I love I know it won’t be the last! And I am sure you will be seeing some of them in coming months.

This is beautiful book, filled with beautiful recipes – I have seen
several reviews for Persiana, but none have mentioned the beautiful cover – scattered across the embossed cover is a mix of spices and rose petals – the embossing makes the cover so tactile that I had fallen in love with Persiana before I had even opened it.

So a BIG thank you to Megan, Val and everyone at Beattie & Forbes for not giving up and this is why I support you.

Those who know me, know I love books. Particularly cook and food books and are aware of my rather extensive collection, so for me a good independent bookshop that goes the extra mile is essential.

And while I am aware that I could have got this by other means, where possible I will support local business so that they stay in
business and continue to add interest and vibrancy to our shopping areas.

Bandari Monkfish TailsBandari Monkfish Tails

The term Bandari signifies anything that comes from a port, but is
usually a reference to the southern port of Bandar Abbas in Iran. When applied to food,
Bandari, indicates the use of spice in a dish. This simple fish dish is rubbed using a special spice mix made with fresh herbs and
aromatics that permeates the fish with a wonderful heady flavour.
Shirazi Salad (a cucumber, tomato and pomegranate salad – also in the book) is the perfect accompaniment to this dish.

Serves 4

½ tsp turmeric
½ tsp curry powder
½ tsp ground cumin
½ tsp ground coriander
2 fat garlic cloves, minced
5cm piece of fresh root ginger, peeled and minced
handful of coriander, leaves picked and finely chopped
handful of dill, leaves picked and finely chopped
finely grated rind and juice of 1 lime
2 tbsp Greek yogurt
olive oil
1 tsp sea salt flakes
¼ tsp freshly ground black pepper
4 monkfish tails or loins, about 175-200g each, skinned and cleaned

1              Mix all the dry spices together in a bowl and add the garlic, ginger, fresh herbs, lime rind and juice, yogurt and a couple of
tablespoons of olive oil. Season with sea salt and black pepper. Stir well using a fork to break up any clumps of spices. Cover the bowl with clingfilm and set aside for at least 30 minutes to allow the spice paste to rest.

Spice Paste

Spice Paste

2              Place monkfish tails in a shallow dish. Give the spice paste a good stir and pour it over the fish. Use your hands to really work the paste into the fish, ensuring all sides get an even coating of the
mixture. Cover the dish with clingfilm and place it in the refrigerator for a maximum of 1 hour. Once marinated, remove from the
refrigerator and bring the fish to room temperature.

3              Preheat a frying pan over a medium-high heat. When the pan is nice and hot, drizzle a little olive oil into the pan. Gently lay the monkfish in the pan and cook for approximately 5 minutes on each side, or until opaque and firm. Transfer the monkfish tails from the pan to serving plates, leave to rest for 1-2 minutes, then serve with a little extra coriander sprinkled on top.

Rachel’s Notes: I have reproduce the recipe as it appears in Persiana, to give you an idea of how the book is written.

  • I made this recipe pretty much as it is written here and the result was excellent.
  • I didn’t have any fresh dill so used a bit extra coriander.
  • Make Ahead: The spice paste could be mixed together earlier in the day.
  • I served the fish with a simple salad of fresh tomatoes, red onions, garlic and balsamic vinegar and some mixed leaves.

Happy cooking and eating.

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Hawke’s Bay Free Range Organic Chickens

chickenThere is often much discussion around how organic and free-range really are organic free-range chickens? When you find out that
Bostock’s Organic Free Range Chickens live in ‘French Chalets’ in a Hawke’s Bay organic apple orchard – you know this is the real deal.

Ben Bostock, son of John Bostock the pioneer of commercial organic apple production in New Zealand, has become just one of three
certified organic chicken farmers in New Zealand and these
chickens are being farmed here in Hawke’s Bay – lucky us!

Since Bostock’s Free Range Organic Chickens came on the market a few months ago I have tried a number of their products including chicken thighs, a whole chicken – which I roasted and that was a memorable meal – and chicken livers.

In a previous post I mentioned the chicken livers and Ben Bostock tells me he believes their chicken livers taste so good “because our chickens are feed whole food and not processed pallets with
antibiotics the chicken livers have not had to work so hard to
process their food meaning better taste. Also our chickens live longer than conventional free range chickens so this helps taste as well.”

Bostocks_multiBostock’s Free Range Organic Chickens are what you think chicken should taste like and well worth the few extra dollars they might cost, but having said that, I feel, they are very reasonably priced as compared to similar products.

Where to find Bostock’s Free Range Organic Chickens:

HAWKE’S BAY

WELLINGTON

Find out more about Bostock’s Free Range Chickens:

Cavolo Nero, Leek & Mustard Colcannon

Cavolo Nero Mash 011aI know I gave you a cavolo nero recipe not long ago and also a cavolo nero fact sheet, but it “‘tis the season” as they say for cavolo nero, so I am making the most of it while is so beautiful.

Left: Cavolo nero at the Hawke's Bay Farmers' Market; Right: Clyde Potter of Epicurean Supplies

Left: Cavolo nero at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’ Market; Right: Clyde Potter of Epicurean Supplies

I purchased the cavolo nero for this recipe from Epicurean Supplies at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’ Market.

Clyde Potter, owner and the force behind Epicurean Supplies
describes himself as the ‘father of cavolo nero in New Zealand’ as he believes he was the first to grow it in New Zealand.

Epicurean Supplies organically grows specialty vegetables – cavolo nero, radicchio, celeriac and a huge range of pumpkins, to name just a few – and herbs and supply many restaurants in the North Island with their wonderful produce. In addition food lovers of Hawke’s Bay can find them at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’ Market each Sunday or can purchase from them direct.

In this recipe, cavolo nero replaces cabbage and the dish is given a spicy hit with the addition of wholegrain mustard.

Cavolo Nero, Leek & Mustard Colcannon

This could also be made with curly kale if you prefer.

Serves 4 as a side dish

50g butter
4 medium leeks, finely sliced
1 bunch cavolo nero, stems removed, leaves shredded
1kg mashing potatoes
½-¾ cup milk, warmed
¼ cup wholegrain mustard

1              Place butter and leeks in a frying pan over a medium heat. Cover and cook, for 8-10 minutes or until soft. Add a little water and cook for 5 minutes longer.
2              Add cavolo nero, and a little more water, if necessary, cover and cook for 10-15 minutes longer or until leeks and cavolo nero are very tender – adding more water during cooking, as necessary – it is important that the mixture does not dry out. The cooked vegetables should be buttery and tender.
3              Meanwhile, place potatoes in a large saucepan, cover with cold water, cover and bring to the boil. Remove cover, add salt to taste and simmer for 10-15 minutes or until potatoes are tender.
4              Drain potatoes, add milk and mash until smooth. Add
mustard and vegetable mixture and mix well to combine.

The Chef’s Garden @ Epicurean Supplies
Kauru Rd, Hastings 4172
Ph: 06-878 3528

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Learn more about cavolo nero and another recipe to try:

Cavolo Nero aka Tuscan Black Cabbage

Cavolo Nero aka Tuscan Black Cabbage

Celeriac, Cavolo Nero & Bacon Mash

Celeriac, Cavolo Nero & Bacon Mash

 

Roasted Harissa Pumpkin

Harissa Pumpkin 011aComing in all shapes, sizes and colours the heritage pumpkins on the Epicurean Supplies stall at the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’ Market at this time of year is a spectacular display and as autumn turns to winter I know there will be more varieties becoming available. Some of the pumpkins or winter squash are huge, last Sunday there was one there that owner Clyde Potter told me weighed 25kg!

However, don’t be put off as they will cut these beauties so you can get just what you need. Clyde is passionate about his pumpkins and takes great pride in telling you about the different varieties.

Harissa Pumpkin 006aFor the health conscious pumpkins are a good choice, they are low in kilojoules, high in fibre and very high in beta-carotene – an
antioxidant that converts into vitamin A.

Don’t throw away the seeds – they are nutritious and delicious,
being a good source of protein, iron and B vitamins. It is quite easy to produce your own roasted pumpkin seeds and while I haven’t tried this recipe on Elise Bauer family food blog Simply Recipes it looks like an easy method to follow.

Roasted Harissa Pumpkin

This easy side dish teams the sweet flavours of honey and cinnamon with the fresh fiery flavours of Orcona Harissa Paste. Serve it alongside
roasted, grilled or pan-cooked meats, chicken or sausages or as part of a vegetarian meal.

Serves 4 as a side dish

2 tbsp olive oil
2 tbsp honey
1 tbsp lemon juice
1 tbsp Orcona Harissa Paste or to taste
1 tsp ground coriander
1 tsp ground cinnamon
salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
1kg piece pumpkin, seeded, peeled and cut into chunks
coriander, to garnish (optional)
lemon wedges, to serve (optional)

1              Preheat oven to 200°C.
2              Place olive oil, honey, lemon juice, harissa, ground coriander, cinnamon and salt and pepper to taste in a bowl and whisk to
combine. Add pumpkin chunks and toss to coat.
3              Transfer pumpkin to a baking tray in a single layer and roast, tossing after 20 minutes, for 30-45 minutes or until pumpkin is
tender. Serve with fresh coriander and lemon wedges, if desired.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Another pumpkin recipe you might like to try:

Pumpkin, Bacon & Tomato Bake

Pumpkin, Bacon & Tomato Bake

 

Six Reasons to Shop at Your Farmers’ Market

Black Barn 005a

Here in Hawke’s Bay we are lucky enough to have two Farmers’ Markets which are held every week of the year – the Napier Urban Food Market each Saturday and the Hastings Farmers’ Market each Sunday. In addition each Saturday through summer there is also the Black Barn Growers’ Market.

These markets give locals and visitors the opportunity to purchase some of the best in-season produce and wonderful artisan products available in New Zealand.

1          You Get to Know the Farmer, Grower or Producer
When you shop at a Farmers’ Market you have the opportunity to get to know the farmer, grower or producer – so introduce yourself and start developing a relationship with the people behind the stall and very soon, in many cases, you will find that you are getting the inside information about when produce is coming into season and what’s best this week on their stall.

The farmer, grower or producer is the expert on what they sell and if you ask they will tell you how to cook or use their goods and often they will even give you recipes – you don’t get that sort of service in a supermarket!

2          You Eat Seasonally so You Save Money
Visiting your local market regularly means you get to know what’s in season when and who has the best tomatoes, potatoes, lettuce, herbs or whatever.

Buying produce in season saves money – when tomatoes, capsicums, zucchini, eggplant, strawberries or asparagus are in-season they taste fantastic (because it is the right time of year to be eating them) and they are inexpensive (because they are plentiful).

Farmers’ Markets are seasonal, that’s why you can’t get everything all year round and that’s why at certain times of year there are more or less stalls in the markets. So we  don’t except to be able to buy strawberries in the middle of winter at your local Farmers’ Market.

Have you heard of the word “scorpacciata” – it means consuming large amounts of a particular local food while it’s in-season – goodness that sounds like me!

3          You Help Support the Local Economy and Businesses
Every stallholder in your Farmers’ Market is a local so by buying from them you are helping to keep money in your local community and helping to support local farmers, growers and businesses and that’s got to be good for everyone.

4          The Produce is Fresher
The food at your local Farmers’ Market will be fresher because it has been grown locally and hasn’t had to travel great distances to get to you. In many cases eggs will have been laid in the last day or so, fruit and vegetables picked yesterday or the day before – that’s why everything looks and tastes so good.

5          It Gives You the Opportunity to Teach Your Kids Where Their Food Comes From
If you have kids take them along with you when you go your Farmers’ Market and they will start to learn where their food comes from and how it is produced, plus it is also a great opportunity to start teaching them life skills such as how to shop for food.

6          It’s Fun
Most importantly shopping at your local Farmers’ Market is fun – you don’t expect to be able to get everything at one stall so you have a wander around and check out what looks good and buy what takes you fancy which means you end up with a fabulous basket or bag of wonderful produce. Plus on the way you are bound to meet other likeminded
people and there are always lots of samples to taste.

By Rachel Blackmore

Cheesy Onion Tart

HohepadThe double hit of cheese – both in the filling and crust – makes this tart extra special and delicious.

Onions are available all year round and Hohepa cheeses are readily available in Hawke’s Bay and really adds a local flavour to the tart.

Speciality food stores, especially those specialising in organic foods, and some supermarkets round the North Island stock Hohepa cheeses otherwise stop by their Farm Shop near Clive or the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’ Markets. To find out more about Hohepa and the nearest retailer to you check their website.

Cheesy Onion Tart

Serves 6-8

FRENCH ONION FILLING
2 tbsp olive oil
about 1kg onions, thinly sliced – be generous rather than economic
sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
1 large free-range egg, lightly beaten
2 tbsp sherry vinegar
¾ cup grated Hohepa Herb and Garlic cheese
CHEESEY PASTRY CRUST
1 cup wholemeal flour
a couple of good grinds of sea salt
¼ teaspoon smoked paprika
100g chopped Hohepa Danbo cheese
60g very cold butter, chopped
3-4 tbsp cold sparkling mineral or soda water

1              For the filling, heat oil and onions in a heavy-based saucepan over a medium heat and cook, stirring for 4-5 minutes. Reduce heat to low, cover and cook, stirring occasionally for 20-30 minutes or until onions have released all their juices. Remove lid, and continue cooking, uncovered, stirring occasionally for 40-60 minutes or until onions caramalise and very tender. Stir in sherry vinegar, remove pan from heat, transfer onion mixture to a bowl and set aside to cool.
2              While the onions are cooking make the pastry crust, place flour, salt and paprika a food processor and pulse to combine. Add cheese and butter and pulse until mixture forms fine crumbs. Add 1 tbsp water at a time, pulsing after each addition until dough binds together and forms a rough ball. Turn dough out and form into a ball, flatten using the palm of your hand to make a disk. Wrap in plastic food warp and chill for 30 minutes.
3              Preheat the oven to 200°C.
4              Place the chilled dough between two sheets of baking paper, and roll out to fit a 23 cm loose bottom flan tin. Roll pastry over
rolling pin, lift, place in tin, then press to fit, leaving a little pastry
extending above the top of the edge of the tin – fold extended edges down. Chill for 20 minutes longer. Line pastry case with baking
paper and weight with uncooked beans, rice or ceramic baking beads and bake for 15 minutes, remove paper and weights and bake for 10 minutes longer. Cool.
5              Add the egg and cheese to onion mixture and mix well to combine. Pour mixture into pastry case and bake for 25-30 minutes or until filling is slightly puffed, golden and cooked through. Remove from oven and stand for 10 minutes before serving with a simple tossed salad of mixed leaves. Alternatively, allow to cool completely and serve at room temperature.

Happy cooking and eating.

Recipe by Rachel Blackmore

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Origin Earth Factory Shop

logoFor those who didn’t get to the Farmers’ Market on Sunday to get their Origin Earth yoghurt or cheese there is now another option – the recently opened Origin Earth Factory Shop at 393 Te Mata Rd.

The shop has the full range of Origin Earth products including their milk – this however is now readily available at supermarkets around Hawke’s Bay – look for it in New World and Pak ‘n’ Sav
supermarkets and at selected retailers.

To find the Origin Earth Factory and Shop head out of Havelock North as if going to Waimarama – the Origin Earth Factory and Shop is housed in the old Te Mata Cheese Factory, you will see signs
directing you to the shop which is down the drive at the back of the factory. The shop is light and airy with easy parking right at the door and while it is early days I am told there are interesting plans a foot – so I think I will visit again in a few months, but at least for now I know where to get my OE yoghurt and cheese during the week.

Origin Earth Cheesy Potatoes

Serves 4

2 tbsp olive oil
2 large potatoes, scrubbed and diced
2 tbsp finely chopped fresh rosemary
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
sea salt
freshly ground black pepper
½ round Origin Earth Camembert Cheese, diced
2 tbsp chopped fresh parsley

1              Preheat oven to 220C.
2              Heat olive oil in a frying pan over a high heat. Add potatoes and sauté for 5 minutes or until starting to soften.
3              Add rosemary, garlic and salt and pepper to taste. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes longer or until potatoes are tender and golden.
4              Transfer potato mixture to an ovenproof dish. Scatter with camembert cheese and bake for 8-10 minutes or until golden and bubbling.
5              Serve immediately scattered with parsley.

Warm Pumpkin & Feta Salad

Serves 2 as a vegetarian main course or 4 as a side dish

1kg pumpkin, peeled and chopped into 2cm cubes
olive oil
1 small red onion, finely chopped
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2 tbsp balsamic vinegar
1 bunch spinach, roughly shredded
¼ cup chopped parsley
160g tub Origin Earth Feta Cheese in Brine, drained and chopped into cubes

1              Preheat oven to 220C.
2              Toss pumpkin in a little olive oil and roast for 20-25 minutes or until pumpkin is soft and golden.
3              Meanwhile, combine red onion, garlic and balsamic vinegar and set aside to macerate while pumpkin is cooking.
4              Turn off oven. Add spinach to pumpkin and toss to combine, return to oven for 5 minutes to wilt spinach.
5              Remove pan from oven, add onion mixture, parsley and half the feta cheese and toss to combine.
6              Serve warm or at room temperature scattered with remaining feta cheese.

Origin Earth Factory Shop
393 Te Mata Rd, Havelock North
Open: Monday to Saturday 11am to 4pm
Visit the Origin Earth website.

Recipes by Rachel Blackmore

Hawke’s Bay Farmers’ Markets

HBFM1

A look in the fridge tells me that I need to stock up on fresh fruit and veg and what better place to do that than at one on the Farmers’ Markets held every weekend here in the Bay. Now the decision is do I need supplies today or can it wait until tomorrow? Either way there is a Farmers’ Market held on Saturday in Napier and then tomorrow there’s the well-known market held at the A&P Showgrounds .

There are lots of good reasons to shop at Farmers’ Markets and these are what I think are six most important:

1. You Get to Know the Farmer, Grower or Producer
When you shop at a Farmers’ Market you have the opportunity to get to know the farmer, grower or producer – so introduce yourself and start developing a relationship with the people behind the stall and very soon, in many cases, you will find that you are getting the inside information about when produce is coming into season and what’s best this week on their stall.

The farmer, grower or producer is the expert on what they sell and if you ask they will tell you how to cook or use their goods and often they will even give you recipes – you don’t get that sort of service in a supermarket!

2. You Eat Seasonally so You Save Money
Shopping at your local market regularly means you get to know what’s in season when and who has the best tomatoes, potatoes, lettuce, herbs or whatever.

Buying produce in season saves money – when tomatoes, capsicums, zucchini, eggplant, strawberries or asparagus are in season they taste fantastic (because it is the right time of year to be eating them) and they are inexpensive (because they are plentiful).

Farmers’ Markets are seasonal that’s why you can’t get everything all year round and that’s why at certain times of the year there are more or less stalls in the markets. So don’t except to be able to buy strawberries in the middle of winter at your local Farmers’ Market.
Have you heard of the word “scorpacciata” – it means consuming large amounts of a particular local food while it’s in season – that’s how I tend to eat!

3. You Help Support the Local Economy and Businesses
Every stallholder in your Farmers’ Market is a local so by buying from them you are helping to keep money in your local community and helping to support local farmers, growers and businesses and that’s got to be good for everyone.

4. The Produce is Fresher
Food at your local Farmers’ Market is fresher because it has been grown locally and hasn’t had to travel great distances to get to you. In many cases eggs will have been laid in the last day or so, fruit and vegetables picked yesterday or the day before and in many cases early that morning – that’s why everything looks and tastes so good.

5. It Gives You the Opportunity to Teach Your Kids Where Their Food Comes From
If you have kids take them along with you when you go your Farmers’ Market and they will start to learn where their food comes from and how it is produced, plus it is also a great opportunity to start teaching them life skills such as how to shop for food and when you get home how to prepare and cook it.

6. It’s Fun
Most importantly shopping at your local Farmers’ Market is fun – you don’t expect to be able to get everything at one stall so you have a wander around and check out what looks good and buy what takes you fancy which means you end up with a fabulous basket or bag of wonderful produce. Plus on the way you are bound to meet other likeminded people and there are always lots of samples to taste.

Napier Urban Food Market – every Saturday, 9am to 10pm in Clive Square, Napier
Held every Saturday, this street market is a smaller version of the well-known Hawke’s Bay Farmers’ Market held every Sunday at the A&P Showgrounds, Hastings. With over 20 stalls this is great place to stock up on fresh Hawke’s Bay produce, artisan products such as bread, preserves, olive oil, honey, cheese, yogurt and more. To sustain you while you browse the stalls there is freshly brewed coffee and a selection of breakfast fare.

Hawke’s Bay Farmers’ Market – every Sunday, 8.30am to 12.30pm at the A&P Showgrounds, Kenilworth Rd, Hastings
As the oldest Farmers’ Market in New Zealand this is a must-do if you are in Hawke’s Bay on a Sunday. During the summer this market operates in the historic Waikoko Gardens with over 60 stalls selling a huge variety of Hawke’s Bay seasonal produce and artisan products. There’s also coffee, juices, smoothies, ice-cream and breakfast fare to keep you going while browsing the market.

I am still undecided which market I am going to shop at this weekend – so I think I will go to both!

Happy cooking and eating.